1. pcbomb

    pcbomb Senior Member

    Shanghai, China
    Chinese - Xanghainese Dialect & Mandarin
    cahier / carnet
    I looked them up in the dictionary, they both mean notebook, are they the same?
     
  2. lamy08 Senior Member

    A carnet is smaller.
    A cahier is mostly used in class.
     
  3. sophie3210

    sophie3210 Senior Member

    Paris
    France and French
    "Cahiers" are usually used in class by schoolboys and schoolgirls, whereas "carnets" are more intended for artistic purpose (writing, drawing, etc.)
     
  4. lamy08 Senior Member

    Most of the time the sheets of a "carnet" are spiral-bound.
     
  5. sophie3210

    sophie3210 Senior Member

    Paris
    France and French
    In fact it depends. If the carnets referred to are luxurious objects, they are most often hardback. But if they are, as you said in #2, smaller objects, they can be spiral-bound (we talk, indeed, of "carnet à spirales", or of "cahiers à spirales").
     
  6. Jean-Michel Carrère Senior Member

    French from France
    The Robert dictionary defines a "carnet" as : "un petit cahier de poche". A small pocket-size notebook.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2011
  7. Wordsmyth

    Wordsmyth Senior Member

    Location: Mostly SW France
    Native language: English (BrE)
    "Notebook" for "carnet", OK. However, but I'd be inclined to translate "cahier" (in the school context mentioned by sophie) as "exercise book" (at least in BrE).

    Both of these words are often found in noun phrases: "cahier des charges", "carnet de voyage", and many more. In such cases, there are specific translations which don't usually include either notebook or exercise book.

    Ws:)
     
  8. sophie3210

    sophie3210 Senior Member

    Paris
    France and French
    But are "exercise books" only meant for exercises ?
    Because our "cahiers" are either used for exercises or lessons...
     
  9. Wordsmyth

    Wordsmyth Senior Member

    Location: Mostly SW France
    Native language: English (BrE)
    No, exercise books aren't limited to exercises (much as you can wear a ciré that doesn't have any wax). The name refers to a type of book (a cahier, in fact). What you write in it is up to you ... or maybe also to your teacher!

    Ws:)
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2011
  10. Wopsy

    Wopsy Senior Member

    The garden of Ireland
    English - Ireland
    I would translate 'cahier' as 'exercise book' or 'copybook, and 'carnet' as 'notebook'
     
  11. Wordsmyth

    Wordsmyth Senior Member

    Location: Mostly SW France
    Native language: English (BrE)
    I had my doubts about "exercise book" in other variants of English (hence my "at least in BrE" in post #7). However, from Wopsy's post and from a little Googling, it does seem that it's also used in Hiberno-English, American English, Australian English and Indian English.

    Ws:)
     
  12. sophie3210

    sophie3210 Senior Member

    Paris
    France and French
    Thanks for the precisions :)
     
  13. funnyhat Senior Member

    Michigan, USA
    American English
    I think we use "workbook" more often than "exercise book" (at least in reference to the books that students write in at school).
     
  14. Wordsmyth

    Wordsmyth Senior Member

    Location: Mostly SW France
    Native language: English (BrE)
    OK funnyhat, I'm sure you're right. Perhaps I found some minority examples of 'exercise book' in AE, but as that post is a year old I can't remember what they were.

    Thinking about it though, I guess it makes sense that Microsoft's use of the word "workbook" in Excel would reflect AE usage.

    Ws:)
     
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