call for thunderstorms

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cool-jupiter

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi, forum members. I have a question.

When I was working on a workbook, I stumbled upon the following correction quiz.

Man: You'd better hurry. I hear they are asking for thunderstorms this afternoon.

Correction: You'd better hurry. I hear they are calling for thunderstorms this afternoon.

I looked up 'call for' in the WR dictionary.
  • to go or come to get;
    pick up;
    fetch:I'll call for you at seven o'clock.
  • to demand;
    request strongly;
    urge to happen:The students called for an end to tuition increases.
  • to require;
    need:This emergency calls for prompt action.
However, none of the meanings seem to fit there. I think 'call for' means 'predict/forecast', but I just can't be sure. Your comment would be much appreciated.
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    It's clear that the author meant "They (i.e. meteorologists) are calling (i.e. announcing) that there will be thunderstorms".

    But I deduce that from the context. I think that the use of call here is incorrect.
     

    cool-jupiter

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Keith Bradford - Thank you for your comments. I'm with you on the point that I should avoid using this usage of "call for."

    You little ripper! - Thanks for the useful link.

    DonnyB - Thank you for providing another link. There is so much to learn.
     

    cool-jupiter

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    RM1(SS) - Thanks for your comment. I'll be sure to use the phrase when I get a chance to have a talk with Americans.

    You little ripper - :thumbsup:
     
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