Call it a fiver

Gabriel Malheiros

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
What does "call it a fiver" mean?

I saw on a movie this scene: A taxi/cab driver pull up alongside a people to pick them up. The passenger get in , the. The car drives off. After a while, the driver realises the passenger is a famous soccer player... Then when the driver pull over to the curb in front of the hotel player is staying at, the driver said: "let's call it a fiver"


Thank you
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "Let's call it X pounds/dollars" is an informal idiomatic way of naming the price of something. I'm guessing it derives from something like "Let's agree on X".
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    "Let's call it X pounds/dollars" is an informal idiomatic way of naming the price of something. I'm guessing it derives from something like "Let's agree on X".
    I agree, but I just want to add that it also implies that it's an approximation, and it also implies that the driver is giving the passenger a small reduction in price.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    and it also implies that the driver is giving the passenger a small reduction in price.
    In this case, I agree it sounds like a reduction. Could it also be used to mean "Let's round it off to a higher number" in some contexts? For example: someone buys various things worth $28.50 (in a place where bargaining is allowed) and the seller says "Let's call it thirty dollars".
     
    Last edited:

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    In this case, I agree it sounds like a reduction. Could it also be used to mean "Let's round it off to a higher number" in some contexts? For example: someone buys various things worth $28.50 (in a place where bargaining is allowed) and the seller says "Let's call it thirty dollars".
    But that never happens, surely?
    Sellers have to go down in price, in my experience. I would be very cross if a trader tried to do this.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    But that never happens, surely?
    I wouldn't say never - at least over here - I can imagine it happening in a situation where a seller gets beaten down on several items and tries to make up for it a bit at the end. I was wondering if "let's call it..." could be used in that context too.
     
    Last edited:

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I wouldn't say never - at least over here - I can imagine it happening in a situation where a seller gets beaten down on several items and tries to make up for it a bit at the end. I was wondering if "let's call it..." could be used in that context too.
    OK, well that is a specific context. In my experience of bartering the buyer never goes back up after a seller has offered a lower price.
    Obviously in that very specific context the buyer could try to say that and see if it worked, but in general terms "let's call it .. " is used to preface a rounding down of a price, not an increase.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Could it also be used to mean "Let's round it off to a higher number"
    Aside from any issues of normal commercial practice on the part of a seller, the expression "let's call it ..." can indeed be used when rounding up or down.

    - I owe you £4.90. I have no small change, and neither do you (or perhaps I'm just feeling generous;)): I say "Let's call it a fiver", and give you a £5 note.

    - "I need 4.9 metres of electrical cable. Let's call it 5 metres."

    - "The journey should take 1h50. With traffic, let's call it 2 hours."

    After a while, the driver realises the passenger is a famous soccer player
    Given that the soccer player probably earns a thousand times what a taxi driver earns, it wouldn't surprise me if the driver jacked the fare up a bit (a short taxi ride in the UK can still be as low as £3) — but then again, there's no accounting for the power of fan worship!:rolleyes:

    Ws
     
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