call me on/at my cell phone

normadela

Senior Member
Perú español
Hi, friends:

I just listened to a song where they use

call me on my cell phone

shouldn´t it be

at my cell phone?

Thanks in advance.
 
  • St. Nick

    Senior Member
    English
    Hi

    Although "on my cell phone" sounds illogical, it's the common way to express the idea. "By way of," though accurate, would sound funny.

    "At my cell phone number" would work well.
     

    obz

    Senior Member
    Yankee English
    Definitely "on my cell/mobile/etc."
    "at"
    would be for the specific number (in US English, I believe British English uses "on" for this)

    Call me on my cell.
    Call me
    at 123-456-7890.
     

    elbaciyelmo

    Member
    English - U.S.
    Call me on the phone. Talk on the phone. If you talk "at the phone," people will think you're crazy!

    If you'd like, you can call me at this number and we'll discuss it over the phone.
     

    EviLito

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Colombia
    Yes, ''at'' is for something fixed. Presumably your cell phone moves around ;)
    and what about "fixed phones"? like the phone installed in your house? Would it be call me at my phone? since it doesn't move around?
     

    normadela

    Senior Member
    Perú español
    Thanks to all you guys for your interest and enthusiasm.

    I especially appreciate obz´s reply which I find so accurate!

    When we help one another we´re contributing to a better world!

    All the best to each one of you!
     

    Sherlockat

    Senior Member
    Castilian (Patagonian)
    Definitely "on my cell/mobile/etc."
    "at"
    would be for the specific number (in US English, I believe British English uses "on" for this)

    Call me on my cell.
    Call me
    at 123-456-7890.
    You're right

    AmericanE: call sb at + a particular number
    BrithishE and AustralianE: call sb on + a particular number
     

    cirrus

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Just to confirm that in UK English you call someone on their phone (mobile or landline). We also talk about (informally) giving someone a ring or a giving someone a bell.
     

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    Can I say-- call me by phone?
    I am not a native speaker, but this would mean that you ask the person to call you using a phone. How else is he/she supposed to call you?
    I would say that "call me" is enough.
    If you really want to specify that the other should use a phone, then maybe:
    "call me up"
    (UK) "ring me (up)"
    "phone me (up)"
    "give me a call"
     

    cirrus

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I am not a native speaker, but this would mean that you ask the person to call you using a phone. How else is he/she supposed to call you?
    I would say that "call me" is enough.
    If you really want to specify that the other should use a phone, then maybe:
    "call me up"
    (UK) "ring me (up)"
    "phone me (up)"
    "give me a call"
    Or just give me a ring (every day British English usage)

    Calling someone up, at least in British English, makes me think primarily about someone being drafted into the military during a war or for national service.
     

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    Calling someone up, at least in British English, makes me think primarily about someone being drafted into the military during a war or for national service.
    I won't question your claim, as you're the native, but you'll have to let Ricky Gervais know though :p (on the Graham Norton show, telling how he called up David Bowie)
     
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