Call on / Come over

PaoloFR1

Senior Member
Italian - Italy
Is there any difference between these two sentences?

-He said he would come over for Easter
-He said he would call on us for Easter

Well, I think that "call on" means "go and visit someone, it is followed by an object" while come over means "come and visit, it isn't follow by object". Is it correct, or can I use also "call on" without and object? Can I say "come over to us for Easter"?
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    To me, the two sentences mean almost the same. I would say that to come over implies a longer visit that to call on. The family might come over for Easter, and stay for an evening or even the whole weekend, whereas a friend may call on you for a short time on his way to the shops.

    The difference is very subtle, and others might not agree.

    You can say "come over to us for Easter", but you can't just 'call on' - you have to 'call on' somebody.
     

    PaoloFR1

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    To me, the two sentences mean almost the same. I would say that to come over implies a longer visit that to call on. The family might come over for Easter, and stay for an evening or even the whole weekend, whereas a friend may call on you for a short time on his way to the shops.

    The difference is very subtle, and others might not agree.

    You can say "come over to us for Easter", but you can't just 'call on' - you have to 'call on' somebody.

    Thank you very much :)
     

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    ("Come over" suggests to me that the distance isn't great and may well be walking distance. "Why don't you come over for a drink?")
    "Call on" sounds rather formal and old-fashioned to me, although others may disagree with me. However, I agree with heypresto's description of it. You can also say "call in".
    "I'll call in on my way home."
    "I'll call in on Fred and see if he wants to go down the pub."
    (You can also "give someone a knock". This is very colloquial. "Give me a knock if you need any help.")
     
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