Call out to

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Alladine

Senior Member
French - France
Hello,
Trying to understand a sentence from the English translation of The courage to be disliked by Ichiro Kishimi and Fumitake Koga:
Context: a philosopher explains why even babies or bedridden old people are useful - because we have to judge other people on the "level of being", not on the "level of acts".
Sentence: Without judging whether or not other people did something, one rejoices in their being there, in their very existence and one calls out to them with words of gratitude.
- You call out to their existence? What on earth are you talking about?

Could you explain that expression please? Would it be an equivalent of "think of"?
Thank you,
Alladine
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    No doubt this is a translation and might have lost a little in the process.
    However, to call out to someone can mean to "say hello" or greet someone or merely acknowledge their presence when you see them.
    That would work here.
     

    Alladine

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Thanks Suzi. However, don't you think it could mean something like "express one's gratitude" (for the fact that the other person is just there, alive...)? I have just met the same expression later in the same text:
    The parents could refrain from comparing their child to anyone else, see him for who he actually is, and be glad and grateful for his being there. (...) They should be able to call out to his existence itself.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Like I said, it's a translation which does not seem very natural, particularly in your second example. At a stretch you could make it mean gratitude - but that is more from the context than the actual words "call out to".
     
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