calorie bomb

  • Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Russian: калорийная бомба
    While it's not entirely unknown, I must mention that Google contains only 116 actual unique search results for "калорийная бомба" (nom.sg.), so it doesn't look like a fully established term either.
    P.S.: Probably that's caused by the fact that the Russian adjective калорийный typically means "high-calorie", which creates a kind of multi-level tautology here.
     

    pimlicodude

    Senior Member
    British English
    While it's not entirely unknown, I must mention that Google contains only 116 actual unique search results for "калорийная бомба" (nom.sg.), so it doesn't look like a fully established term either.
    Well, I don't think the phrase "calorie bomb" means anything in particular in (good) English either. Or at least, younger speakers and/or American speakers like neologisms, and this may mean something to them - but not to me. Calorie Bomb is in the Urban Dictionary online - that site is a compilation of trendy words, youth slang, etc. As an English-language copy-editor once, I would have edited out any words found in the Urban Dictionary.
     
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    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    Well, I don't think the phrase "calorie bomb" means anything in particular in (good) English either. Or at least, younger speakers and/or American speakers like neologisms, and this may mean something to them - but not to me. Calorie Bomb is in the Urban Dictionary online - that site is a compilation of trendy words, youth slang, etc. As an English-language copy-editor once, I would have edited out any words found in the Urban Dictionary.
    I think the crucial difference is that the English expression is perfectly well-formed and semantically unquestionable. The metaphor is transparent: “a sudden release of a large amount of calories is an explosion” + “food is a container of energy”. The only thing that can be said against the expression is that it hasn't found its way into major dictionaries yet.

    Meanwhile in Russian, калорийный's everyday meaning is “high-calorie, fattening”, and in general the language is nowhere near as prone to forming idiomatic adjective+noun expressions as English is to forming noun+noun idiomatic quasi-compounds. One would be hard pressed to tell whether the English expression was coined in English or translated, while the Russian one sticks out immediately as a piece of translationese.

    Bonus: the expression seems to originate in German, in the technique of bomb calorimetry, which measures the actual amount of energy produced by an object (incl. foodstuffs) if oxidised (burned) completely. Needless to say, that's not how the human body absorbs energy.
     
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    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Well, I don't think the phrase "calorie bomb" means anything in particular in (good) English either.
    Yes, that was my feeling, too. I have thought, too, it does not exist in English. So do you have something similar, better in English? I am wondering now which language the word has been invented in?
     

    pimlicodude

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, that was my feeling, too. I have thought, too, it does not exist in English. So do you have something similar, better in English? I am wondering now which language the word has been invented in?
    I don't mean to say that no native speaker uses it - but most of these new phrases are looked at askance by older native speakers. You can just say "a type of food very high in calories". Or maybe "a calorie-dense item of food". [I don't like "a food", as a countable noun, but it can be found in native speech, and is also a newer usage.]
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    I bet the English word "calorie bomb" will be a common word in the next 10-15 years, let's come back later and read my comment. :) I think there are -isms (Germanism?) even in English, no? Mostly in American English. Too bad there are no comments from Americans here.
     

    pimlicodude

    Senior Member
    British English
    I bet the English word "calorie bomb" will be a common word in the next 10-15 years, let's come back later and read my comment. :) I think there are -isms (Germanism?) even in English, no? Mostly in American English. Too bad there are no comments from Americans here.
    Well, yes, the centre of gravity of the English language is only going in one direction...
     

    HilfswilligerGenosse

    Senior Member
    German, High German
    In German, Kalorienbombe is a normal, colloquial term for any food that is high in calories. Vorsicht/Achtung, das ist eine Kalorienbombe! or Das ist aber eine Kalorienbombe...
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Romanian: bombă calorică

    I'd expect to find this in a women's mag, probably referring to pastries and giant pretzels. We do love our soft giant pretzels here.
     
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    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English (US - northeast)
    There is a group of people in the US who are very concerned with "being fit", "not being overweight", "eating healthy", "losing weight". They count the number of calories in everything they might eat. For those people, a food item with a lot of calories in it is "bad". It is so bad that it might be called a "bomb" -- a "calorie bomb".

    But that isn't everybody, or even most people. It is not part of the English language. I have never heard it spoken, so I don't think it is common in speech.
     

    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    Finnish: kaloripommi.
    Btw. there is a yogurt called Hedelmäpommi (Fruit bomb) since 1968, which is also the most popular yogurt in Finland.
     

    Nanon

    Senior Member
    français (France)
    French: bombe calorique.
    Btw. there is a yogurt called Hedelmäpommi (Fruit bomb) since 1968, which is also the most popular yogurt in Finland.
    There is an old-fashioned ice-cream dessert, bombe glacée, prepared in a spherical mould to resemble a... frozen bomb (a cannonball rather than a bomb, actually).
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    There is an old-fashioned ice-cream dessert, bombe glacée, prepared in a spherical mould to resemble a... frozen bomb (a cannonball rather than a bomb, actually).
    My parents tell the story about how they were helping out with catering at Bradford Cathedral when the Queen visited many years ago, and somebody said "the bomb is in the fridge", referring to this kind of bombe. It caused a flurry of activity among the security guards.
     

    Nanon

    Senior Member
    français (France)
    Original "bombs" actually were hollow cannonballs
    True, this is why they still look like this in comics, emojis, etc...: 💣
    @se16teddy, you made me laugh... and remember a similar story that happen to me decades ago. I was on a plane of the now defunct airline Viasa. The take-off was being delayed and delayed again. Suddenly there was an announcement: "Tenemos un problema con una bomba..."
    Passengers: Aaaaaaaaah!!! :eek::eek::eek:
    Crew: ... hidráulica.
    Passengers: Pfffeeeeewwwwwww!!!!!!!!
    Una bomba means both a bomb and a pump in Spanish, but if there is a problem on a plane and you are not a mechanical engineer, the first thing that comes to your mind is... 💣
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I haven't heard it before (not that I remember).

    There are five examples in the COCA American English database. Basically in magazines with health focuses. That's not nothing but it's not very many relative to other terms I've searched for.
     
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