camel

Jana337

Senior Member
čeština
Do you say
البل او جمال؟

What is the Arabic expression for „ship of the desert“/“Wüstenschiff“?

:eek: باخرة الصحراء؟

شكرا جزيلا

يتة
 
  • elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Whodunit said:
    You meant "هل تقل إبل أم جمل؟". ;) :tick:

    إبل = collective meaning of "camels" :tick:
    جمل = meaning "camel" in the sense of "one" camel. :tick:
    And the plural is جمال. I think Jana was asking about the difference between إبل and جمال.

    Both are plural and mean "camels." However, إبل cannot be used with numbers to refer to a specific quantity of individual camels. In that case, you would have to say جمال. I hope the difference is clear.
    Here you go: سفينة الصحراء :tick:
    Wonderful, Whodunit! :thumbsup:
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    one more:
    A cameleer or a camel man(Jammal) : جمّال
    the "meem"-مـ "is mushaddadah

    cameleers or camel men(Jommal):جُمّال

    Thank you
    Ayed
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    And جمال (with an "a" instead of an "u" on the first letter) = beauty ;) :D

    جمال جمال جمال = the beauty of the camels of a cameleer

    (Supply the missing vowels! ;))
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    elroy said:
    جمال جمال جمال = the beauty of the camels of a cameleer

    (Supply the missing vowels! ;))
    Oh wonderful! Those genitives. I have to remember such a construction. I know my next homework: Pronunciation. :D :D :D
    ayed said:
    the "meem"-مـ "is mushaddadah
    What are you speaking about? Do you mean that the "meem" indicates the acting meaning of a person? Example:

    "mudarris - mudarriseh (teacher/female teacher)" of "darrisa" (to teach).
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Whodunit said:
    What are you speaking about? Do you mean that the "meem" indicates the acting meaning of a person? Example:

    "mudarris - mudarriseh (teacher/female teacher)" of "darrasa" (to teach). (from "darasa," to study)
    It's not always a "meem."

    It's a "meem" if there's already a shaddeh on the second radical of the verb in question.
    If there is no shaddeh, the form changes but no "meem" is added. Usually an "alef" is added between the first and the second radicals.

    Examples:

    WITHOUT SHADDEH:

    la3iba - to play
    laa3ib - player

    kataba - to write
    kaatib - writer

    WITH SHADDEH:

    la77ana - to compose (a tune)
    mula77in - composer

    sawwara - to photograph
    musawwir - photographer

    (PS: la7en - tune; suura - photograph)
    Whodunit said:
    Oh wonderful! Those genitives. I have to remember such a construction. I know my next homework: Pronunciation. :D :D :D
    The answer (if you want it):

    jamaalu jimaali jammaalin
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    elroy said:
    It's not always a "meem."

    It's a "meem" if there's already a shaddeh on the second radical of the verb in question.
    If there is no shaddeh, the form changes but no "meem" is added. Usually an "alef" is added between the first and the second radicals.

    Examples:

    WITHOUT SHADDEH:

    la3iba - to play
    laa3ib - player

    kataba - to write
    kaatib - writer

    WITH SHADDEH:

    la77ana - to compose (a tune)
    mula77in - composer

    sawwara - to photograph
    musawwir - photographer

    (PS: la7en - tune; suura - photograph)
    I hope it's all right if we dredge up old posts. I was just looking through some of the older threads and this caught my eye.

    An easier way to remember this is that with Form I verbs (fa3ala) the structure is faa3il. With the rest (forms II-X -- fa33ala, faa3ala, etc.) the structure is with a meem.

    By the way, I liked your play on words. That's brilliant. While not as inventive as yours, here's one that is proverb (at least in Egyptian colloquial):

    الجار جار ولو جار il-gaar gaar wa law gaar (Egyptian pronunciation)

    An approximate translation would be. "Your neighbor is your neighbor, even if he acts wrongly."

    gaar is a noun which means neighbor. The word is also a verb (unrelated to the noun neighbor) which means to go to far or encroach. The conjugation used here is the masculine singular form in the past tense.
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Josh Adkins said:
    الخار خار ولو خار il-gaar gaar wa law gaar (Egyptian pronunciation)
    An approximate translation would be. "Your neighbor is your neighbor, even if he acts wrongly."
    Hi Josh,
    I haven't heard this proverb before, but it's a very good one. But please notice that the word (gaar), be it pronounced Egyptian or any other colloquial Arabic is written with a ج not a خ ; so the proverb is to be written like this : الجار جار ولو جار and you translated it well : a neighbor is a neighbour even if he's unfair (or even if treats us badly).

    there's an etymological difference between the two "gaar" (the word and the verb)

    the word comes from the root ج - ي -ر hence the word جيرة jeera (or jeeratun) pronounced in Egypt with a (g) instead of the (j), the plural جيران jiiraan/giiraan (neighbors)

    as for the verb (that comes in the end of the sentence and means : do injustices, do harm...) its root is ج - و - ر from which comes the word الجور al-juur (or al-jawr) = injustice, opression, and the present tense is yajuuru يجور .

    Again the proverb : you can also pronounce it with a (j) (i.e. al-jaar jaar...) and it will still give you the same meaning. :)
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Josh,

    Dredging up old threads is not only permissible but encouraged. In fact, the fact that you brought this one back to the forefront made me aware of a typo in the solution to my "riddle" - I have since edited it. Thanks for the quote - I wasn't familiar with it either! Please remember, though: try not to get too far off topic. You are more than welcome to begin new threads with quotes/puns/plays on words (or anything else) that you find interesting.

    Thanks,
    elroy qua mod
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    Yeah, I am not used to the Arabic keyboard yet, and as such I make a lot of mistakes. I really need to proofread better. I'm going to go back and fix it.
     
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