camomiles [camomile, chamomile]

  • Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Hi Fagin, if you mean "camomiles on a meadow", it's fine. Each plant is a camomile. There is more than one plant. One camomile, several camomiles. The only problem is that the definite article "the" is missing in front of "the Carpathians".
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    The plural form sounds strange to me. The only time I might use it is if I happened to be talking about the different varieties of the plant:

    The two most common chamomiles used by herbalists are the Roman and the German ones.


    However, I'd be more likely to say:

    The two most common varieties of chamomile used by herbalists are the Roman and the German ones.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The plural form sounds strange to me. The only time I might use it is if I happened to be talking about the different varieties of the plant:

    The two most common chamomiles used by herbalists are the Roman and the German ones.


    However, I'd be more likely to say:

    The two most common varieties of chamomile used by herbalists are the Roman and the German ones.
    :thumbsup: The plural sounds strange to me too.

    I would spell it without the 'h', though I see they are listed everywhere as alternatives.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I agree that camomiles sounds odd in the caption. I'd say camomile in a meadow in the Carpathians ... but if I was short of space I might say a Carpathian camomile meadow:) If I wanted to emphasize the pluralness of it, I'd say camomile flowers in a Carpathian meadow:idea:

    No, left:rolleyes:
     
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