campesinos campesinado

Cual consideran ustedes que es la mejor manera de traducir "compesinos". Countrymen? rural worker?s Country workers?
En ese caso habría alguna palabra para campesinado? Gracias
 
  • The context is:
    "La participación de las organizaciones campesinas en la vida social y política del país es de suma importancia..."
    "La crisis económica del campesinado ha traido como consecuencia que los conflictos se desarrolen por fuera de las vías institucionales..."
     

    Driven

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    I wouldn't say peasants. That is a word that is really not used (at least not in AE) and it has a little bit of a negative connotation. I would probably say "blue collar organizations" for campesinos. Maybe middle class for campesinado. I'm not sure about it because my translations are working classes as opposed to rural/city references but just reading the sentences, those were the words that came to mind. Let's see what others say!
     

    stooge1970

    Senior Member
    English/USA
    To be honest I would say that it depends on what country is being described. True, I wouldn't normally use the word "peasant" to describe anyone in the U.S., but at the same time I wouldn't use "blue-collar" or "middle class" to describe the campesinos living in the mountains in, say, Nicaragua, especially because "campesinos" don't live in the city, and I definitely associate "blue collar" with the city.
     

    Heredianista

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    It does truly depend on the specifics of the context in question.

    Campesinos are sometimes inhabitants of indigenous communities, which often consist mostly of farmers.

    Sometimes, campesino can be translated simply as "small-hold farmer, subsistence farmer or rural villager." Sometimes. But even then, that's a long translation for a single word.

    A few other possibilities and considerations are addressed here: A word about the word campesino.

    However, even this attempt to broaden the definition of campesino falls short.

    In my current document, some campesinos are wage-laborers on government-seized plantations that have been converted into [exceedingly complex] farming cooperatives. They own no land. The farm they work on is huge, and makes profits.

    Other campesinos in my current document are factory workers in rural areas. (For example, ginning and baling cotton brought in from the fields.) And they are very active in campesino movements!

    ___________________________________________________________________________

    It may also interest you all to note that the word campesino now appears in English language dictionaries:

    Definition of CAMPESINO

    Campesino definition and meaning | Collins English Dictionary

    Having said that, I find the definitions provided in these entries woefully limited and limiting.

    ___________________________________________________________________________

    My current solution is to include a Translator's Note at the beginning of my translation, saying:

    The word “campesino” in this text refers to a small-hold farmer, rural wage-laborer, or member of a
    low-income, rural [and often indigenous] community.


    [I am open to suggestions for improvement!]

    From then on out, I use the word "campesino" without italicizing it (since it is now a word in English.)
     
    Last edited:

    LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    Campesinos are farm-workers in western US-E. I like Heredianista's solution, though - explain, then leave as "campesinos", since the word has crossed the border with the rest of us.
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    It does truly depend on the specifics of the context in question.
    :thumbsup: Yes. The country is also relevant. In Spain, campesino doesn't have too much use today but there are a bunch of related terms and it's not always easy to differentiate one from the other and even a term itself is open to different nuances (for example, you could find that a term is used both for people that own the land and people that don't own it). I talked a bit about some of those terms in this other thread although I just gave a general meaning for campesino without entering into details and nuances so it won't be really useful for an accurate translation.
     

    Heredianista

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    :thumbsup: Yes. The country is also relevant. In Spain, campesino doesn't have too much use today but there are a bunch of related terms and it's not always easy to differentiate one from the other and even a term itself is open to different nuances (for example, you could find that a term is used both for people that own the land and people that don't own it). I talked a bit about some of those terms in this other thread although I just gave a general meaning for campesino without entering into details and nuances so it won't be really useful for an accurate translation.
    Thank you for linking this other thread.

    I am frustrated with the ways "campesino" tends to be translated in English because they are inaccurate. There is no word or term in English that fully and properly conveys what "campesino" means.

    "Peasant," for example, suggests someone from a pre-industrial [medieval] era. Although campesinos are associated with rural life, and they sometimes do work the land in arrangements reminiscent of those of feudal serfs, others work with machinery--there is a lot of machinery in agriculture these days, and many campesinos work on large, profit-driven plantations.

    Many campesinos participate in current regional, national and international political organizations--often for campesinos' rights--that are informed by current issues and perspectives.

    And etc.... Now I begin to repeat myself. ; )
     
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