can a <brother> get some air conditioning up here?

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AliBadass

Senior Member
persian
In the series prison break an inmate in his cell tells an officer: Hey, can a brother get some air conditioning up here, coach? It's hotter than a crack ho's mouth, man.

What does ''brother'' refer to here? Is it an officer or an inmate? I mean, is the inmate saying ''can an officer get us some air conditioning up here'' or ''can we(inmates) get/have some air conditioning up here''?
 
  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    It's refers to the person who is saying it. It's AAVE.

    So, the person saying it is referring to himself as "a brother".
     

    AliBadass

    Senior Member
    persian
    Thank you. But if the sentence was like ''can a brother get us some air conditioning'', it would we vice versa, right?
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    In that case, it would mean "... can an African American get us some A/C ...", in AAVE.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    No, "white people" in the USA use this kind of language too, but it stems from AAVE, in my opinion.
     
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