Can any response option in a questionnaire "score" high/low in the report?

meijin

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi, let's say a survey asked a question with four response options, and produced the following results.

40% chose
"I went to the store to buy brand X".
30% chose "I went to the store to buy some other brand, but bought brand X".
20% chose "I went to the store without deciding which brand to buy, and bought brand X".
10% chose "I went to the store to just window-shop, but bought brand X".

Is it appropriate to use the verb "score" and write the following sentence in the report?

"I went to the store to buy brand X" scores highest, followed by "I went to the store to buy some other brand, but bought brand X".

The reason I ask this is that I associate "score" with people/things that compete (e.g. teams, brands, products). The above four options don't really compete, in my opinion.
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I can see what you mean. The trouble is I cannot think of a succinct way of saying this otherwise. "is the most popular response" needs 5 words, and may not work if you need to talk about the other answers too.
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thank you both very much for the replies. :)

    The trouble is I cannot think of a succinct way of saying this otherwise.
    Me neither. The PowerPoint survey reports I receive for a translation purpose are usually crowded with charts and Japanese text, and since English requires more words/letters than Japanese to say the same thing, I prefer to make English translations as simple as possible. I think it's inevitable to use the verb "score" here.

    Well, if they are alternatives and you cannot choose 2 or more answers, they actually compete. :) I am fine with 'score'.
    That's good to know. At the same time, what about when a questions asks, for example,
    "Why did you buy this product? Please choose all the reasons that apply." (e.g. "It was cheap", "It seemed easy to use", "Someone I know recommended it"). Is "score" still fine because these reasons compete (i.e. some get chosen, others don't)?
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    :D Well, in that case they still compete, perhaps - they compete for the title 'most frequently selected answer'. It does not matter if the sum of all percentages exceeds 100%.
     

    meijin

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Well, if the readers are BE speakers, it seems. I wasn't familiar with
    "the commonest" (I thought "the most common" was more common :)), so I've just read most common / commonest, and learned the AE/BE difference.

    So, I think I'll avoid using "the commonest" or "the most common", and use Suzi's "most popular response". But maybe there's a shorter way to say the same thing. How about the following?

    "I went to the store to buy brand X" was the top response/answer, followed by "I went to the store to buy some other brand, but bought brand X".
     
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