Can English names be created by imagination?

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123er

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Mandarin Chinese
When I looked up English names, I found that many of them were newly created words that appeared in the past 30 years. But they still have a beautiful meaning that is extended, and non-native speakers can't see the connection.

What is the basis for creating a new English name word?

I hope I have described my question clearly.Thank you.
 
  • In the US today it is also not uncommon for parents to give their children names that have no meanings whatsoever, but are simply sounds that seem "name-like." It is also not uncommon for such names to be spelled in ways that may not appear to represent the intended sound of the name.
     
    When I looked up English names, I found that many of them were newly created words that appeared in the past 30 years. But they still have a beautiful meaning that is extended, and non-native speakers can't see the connection.

    What is the basis for creating a new English name word?
    There is no book of rules for creating new names, in theory a name could be almost anything.

    Could you give us some examples of such names that you have found? If we have examples we can try to explain how they may have been formed.
     
    In both English and Chinese cultures, a person has 3 names: a surname and 2 given names. Surnames (family names) are usually copies of the father's name. The wife (in the US) and children all use that surname.

    In Chinese culture, given names can be any two Chinese words. In the US, a given name is (usually) not an English word. This is easy in English, since most given names (and most words) are 2-4 syllables long.

    In US culture, about 80% of given names are standard names, not new words. There are thousands of standard names. Each one has various spellings and nicknames. For example the name "Katherine" can be Kathy, Kate, Kat, Catherine, Cathy, Cate, Caty, or even Catlyn. So one "traditional" name creates 9 modern names.

    What is the basis for creating a new English name word?
    There is no rule. There is no law. In theory, it can be anything.

    Sometimes it is a nickname (like "Bubba"). Sometimes it is a name from a foreign country (like "Monique" from France). Sometimes a surname is used as a given name ("Cooper", "Morgan"). Sometimes the name reflects a subculture. Many Afro-American names are created using popular endings (like "-isha", "-iqua").

    But it can be anything the parents choose. Once a child is a teen-ager or adult, they can choose to "be called" something else, if they don't like their official name. They might use a nickname, or initial letters, etc.
     
    In both English and Chinese cultures, a person has 3 names: a surname and 2 given names. Surnames (family names) are usually copies of the father's name. The wife (in the US) and children all use that surname.
    Not all people have three names. Some have two, some have four or more. These days wives do not always take their husband's name. Some famous people have only one name.
     
    In Chinese culture, given names can be any two Chinese words.
    I don't know about Chinese naming but it might (or might not) be similar to Japanese - the kanji character(s) for the "name" have a desired (positive) meaning when read as "words" so someone's name may be Haru because haru means spring, a season of growth and renewal. There's little such possibility of creating new names like that in English.

    (My forum name is inspired by my two middle names so I have four:))
     
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