Can I have/get two forks, please? (In a cafe or restaurant.)

wolfbm1

Senior Member
Polish
Hello.

Here is the sitation.
I and my wife are sitting at a table in a cafe or restaurant. I have just ordered a large piece of white chocolate cheesecake with a splash of sour cherry sauce.
We decided to share the plate. How would you ask the waiter for two forks?

Can I have two forks, please?
Can I get two forks, please?

Is there a difference in meaning?

Thank you.
 
  • joanvillafane

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    I find this just a little strange. Presumably if the waiter brought you a piece of cake, you would have your own fork. So you just need to ask for an extra fork. In any case, I agree with "Could you bring us/get us another fork, please?"
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I find this just a little strange. Presumably if the waiter brought you a piece of cake, you would have your own fork. So you just need to ask for an extra fork. In any case, I agree with "Could you bring us/get us another fork, please?"
    Thank you, joanvillafane.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thank you, Rover_KE. So, in AE the request would not mean: "Can I go to the counter and bring an extra fork?"
    Correct. It's used in ordering food, too: "Can I get the bacon cheeseburger?" It always sounds amusing to me: of course you can, that's why it's on the menu. :D But people do it.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I and my wife are sitting at a table in a cafe or restaurant. I have just ordered a large piece of white chocolate cheesecake with a splash of sour cherry sauce.
    We decided to share the plate. How would you ask the waiter for two forks?
    Since the question has been answered, I'll just add my approach: "We'd like one white chocolate cheesecake and two forks, please."

    Save your server an extra trip and dig into dessert sooner. :)

    Added: Cross-posted with Egmont. Ask for two forks first, decide later. :p
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    And here's the approach I use:

    We'd like a slice of the white chocolate cheesecake to share, please.​

    The waiter will naturally bring two forks, as nobody expects people to share a dish using a single fork.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thinking about that, I finally realized why I don't use that technique – it is rare for me to meet a server with much English and the "share" almost always gets lost or ignored. It's "two forks/spoons" at the end that they remember. :)
     
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