Can I pass by?

Lambara

New Member
Portuguese
Hi,

I need to contact a person by e-mail and deliver something to her.

Is its correct to say "Can I pass by your office tomorrow and give it to you?"

Thanks
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Can I stop by...
    If you pass by, you won't be stopping. You'll just throw it at them as you continue on your way.
     

    Ah_poix_e

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    Can I stop by...
    If you pass by, you won't be stopping. You'll just throw it at them as you continue on your way.
    Hi Myridon,

    Could I also say: Can I go by your office?
    I reckon going by X means you will stop at X, as opposed to saying passing by.

    Thank you. :)
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hi Myridon,

    Could I also say: Can I go by your office?
    I reckon going by X means you will stop at X, as opposed to saying passing by.

    Thank you. :)
    You reckon incorrectly.

    I have been going by a bar next to the post office for 10 years. I have never stopped there.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1569957[/URL] , where Forero states (post 4) that "going by" can mean stopping by!
    Is this wrong then?
    No. It's ambiguous

    In your post you said: "I reckon going by X means you will stop at X, as opposed to saying passing by."

    The "will" takes it out of the realm of '"going by" can mean stopping by!'
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I think the problem here is the use of can.
    To pass by means to be passing or be near, so if you want to say that you'll be calling in at someone's office you could say I will be passing/stopping by your office tomorrow. Can I give it to you then?
    Can I pass by your office? sounds to me a strange thing to ask.
     

    Ah_poix_e

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    No. It's ambiguous

    In your post you said: "I reckon going by X means you will stop at X, as opposed to saying passing by."

    The "will" takes it out of the realm of '"going by" can mean stopping by!'
    Oh, ok, got it. :)

    But would "go by" be more correct than "pass by" in the context above? Would you understand it (go by) as stopping at the office?
     
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