Can I pickle meat?

marsbeing

Senior Member
The Cambridge Dictionaries Online says pickle is to preserve vegetables or fruit in vinegar or salty water. So if I am to do this with minced meat, can I use this term too? If not, which word I should use?

Also do you have any name for minced meat preserved in brine?

Thanks.
 
  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    We talk about curing meat. See WR Dictionary (Collins) sense 5:
    a process or method of preserving meat, fish, etc, by salting, pickling, or smoking
    We might talk about things like pickled herring, for instance, a Scandinavian speciality.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I have never heard of minced meat being preserved in brine. Is this a Chinese dish?
    'Pickled' refers to being preserved in vinegar and spices.
    I can't think of any meat available preserved in brine, just tuna fish.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Ah yes, the Royal Navy, hard tack and maggots, sauerkraut for the scurvy. I was thinking of something I might see on supermarket shelves in the UK or make myself if I took complete leave of my senses. The nearest I can think of is marinading beef brisket.
     

    marsbeing

    Senior Member
    Thanks for your help, everyone.

    In ancient China, people used to preserve meat in brine. The meat could be minced in some cases.

    Can I call meat preserved this way pickle?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    to preserve meat in brine.

    Can I call meat preserved this way pickle?
    You can but you would have to add "in brine" -> the meat was pickled in brine." as the current default meaning for "pickle" is "in vinegar [and spices]"
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    You can but you would have to add "in brine" -> the meat was pickled in brine." as the current default meaning for "pickle" is "in vinegar [and spices]"
    I think that default meaning of "pickle=vinegar" is a regional or cultural thing. WhenI lived in the UK I had that default reaction, but moving to the US and being exposed to a lot of Asian food, I would say that pickled=preseved in vinegar or salt +/- spices etc. The US dictionaries say that and, a little to my surprise, Collins does too. I still support the recommendation of including the clarification when describing the inced meat product - that will nto yet be familiar to many in "the West":)
     

    Juhasz

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    I think that default meaning of "pickle=vinegar" is a regional or cultural thing
    I agree - but the cultural divide is not European/Asian, or something of that sort. Sauerkraut, kosher dill pickles (in fact, most pickled cucumbers) and other pickles produced in Central Europe are made without the use of vinegar. They are submerged in brine, or else simply salted (as in the case of sauerkraut) and made sour through the process of lacto-fermentation. I don't know how common the term is, but I'd call pickling in vinegar (as opposed to salt or brine) "quick pickling."
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    You can but you would have to add "in brine" -> the meat was pickled in brine." as the current default meaning for "pickle" is "in vinegar [and spices]"
    I think that default meaning of "pickle=vinegar" is a regional or cultural thing.
    I agree - but the cultural divide is not European/Asian, or something of that sort.
    My comment was in response to Paul's description of the meaning - not the actual processes used in different areas for different foods. Some people think "vinegar" when they hear the word "pickle", others think " brine or vinegar etc".
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I have never heard of minced meat being preserved in brine. Is this a Chinese dish?
    'Pickled' refers to being preserved in vinegar and spices.
    I can't think of any meat available preserved in brine, just tuna fish.
    I think you can brine it but then have to let the meat dry out in order to preserve it.

    Curing Meat By Dry Salting Or With A Salt Brine

    Salt inhibits the growth of microorganisms (including those on meat). It does this by drawing out water from the microbial cell (by osmosis) due to the high concentration of salt outside the cell. The cell loses water until it reaches a state where it cannot grow and then cannot survive any longer. [...]
     
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