Can I say "I will hook you up there at 3" ... hook up

  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    No. We would say "I will hook up with you there at 3". To "hook" is to link something together with something else. "I will hook you up" means that you will hook that person up with something/someone else ie:

    "We'll go on a double-date. I'll hook you up with my sister"
     

    desert_fox

    Senior Member
    English
    I will hook up with you there at 3.

    You would never hook someone up unless you were putting handcuffs on them.
     

    robbie21

    Senior Member
    English, Nottingham
    I wouldn't say "there". If I wanted to specify place, I would say "I'll see you there at 3".
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I wouldn't say "there". If I wanted to specify place, I would say "I'll see you there at 3".
    A: "Do you want to get together for coffee later?"
    B: "Sure, that sounds good"
    A: "Well, I'm going to be down near ABC coffee shop later today"
    B: "Okay, I'll hook up with you there at 3"

    Sounds perfectly natural to me.
     

    Æsop

    Banned
    English--American (upstate NY)
    "Hook up" is a phrase that is probably better left to native speakers, and they should be careful how they use it, too, because it has taken on a slang meaning of "to have sexual intercourse with."
     

    Basil Ganglia

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I think the last time I heard this phrasal verb was in a movie, and it was used to mean to help. It read more or less like this, "When my dad gets re-elected, I will totally hook you up."
    In that context it means more than simply "to help". This usage means that the speaker will arrange a personal introduction for the listener with the speaker's father.
     

    ATLGradStudent

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Aesop makes a good point about "hook up" or "hook up with" having taken a slang meaning, so be careful.

    Majilo use of "hook you up" has essentially the same meaning as Dimcl's "I'll hook you up with my sister." Majilo's phrase just leaves the "with" and the object understood. In such a case, "hook you up" means "I'll take care of you" or "I'll hook you up ... with whatever you need."
     

    robbie21

    Senior Member
    English, Nottingham
    Certainly one could hook oneself up with a lady. Alternatively, one could hook oneself up with an inanimate object. For example, if one were to customise one's car, one could ask someone to "hook one up with spray" (see "2 Fast 2 Furious").
     
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