Can I see some ID?

Little Star

Senior Member
Persian
Hello,

I've just heard this on a video and am wondering whether this is grammatically correct. Or as far as it's a spoken mistake you can use it?
For me, some defines a few and for asking a card I'd rather say "an ID", isn't it so?

Thanks in advance.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    ID is identification: it's a non-count noun. It might be an ID card, a passport, a driver's licence, but it's not a particular countable thing.

    Note: If it's a spoken mistake, you can't use it. If you can use it, it's grammatically correct. There isn't a difference between 'grammatical' and 'spoken'.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "ID" stands for "identification". The sentence says "Can I see some identification?" That is a correct sentence. It is more general than "Can I see an ID (card)?"

    "Some" means "one or more" with countable nouns (not "a few"), and "an unstated amount of" with uncountable nouns. The word "some" avoids stating the quantity (how many or how much).
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Can I see some ID/identification? = Can I see something that serves to identify you?
    For me, some defines a few and for asking a card I'd rather say "an ID", isn't it so?
    While ID is uncountable and "some" doesn't specify the number, in this context it usually means that only one form of identification is needed. If more than one ID document was needed, the speaker would specify that.
     
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