Can "last morning" mean "yesterday morning"?

EdisonBhola

Senior Member
Korean
If "last week" means "the week before this week", then can "last morning" mean "the morning before this morning"? I think the norm is to say "yesterday morning", and I'm just wondering if "last morning" means the same thing?

Thank you so much.
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Would you please provide the sentence where you think it might be possible to use "last morning" in this way. Then we can give you a better answer.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    No, we don't say 'last morning'. The only way it is used is completely different: the last morning of the holidays is the morning of the last day, the day the holidays end.

    cross-posted
     

    EdisonBhola

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Would you please provide the sentence where you think it might be possible to use "last morning" in this way. Then we can give you a better answer.
    Maybe a context works better?

    e.g. Today is 2nd of June. I want to talk about "the morning before this morning" (in other words, the morning of 1st of June). I think "last morning" doesn't work here right? Only "yesterday morning" does.

    But interestingly, if today is in the 2nd week of June. Then using "last week" to talk about "the week before this week" works fine.
     

    Ann O'Rack

    Senior Member
    UK
    UK English
    We do not use "last morning" in the same way as we use "last week", as entangledbank explained very clearly. There is no reason why we don't use it, we just don't. Isn't English fun! :D
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The adjective 'last' (without an article) seems to have a minimum referent of 'afternoon' and later.
    Last second/minute/hour/morning.:cross: Although last second/hour are used adjectivally: "More last second/minute deals from travel agents."
    Last day does not work as there is a word for it: yesterday
    Last afternoon/evening/night/<day of the week>/week/month/year/Easter/Christmas/birthday.:tick:

    Last should be seen as the superlative: late, latter, last.
     

    Ann O'Rack

    Senior Member
    UK
    UK English
    I would never say "last afternoon" or "last evening" to mean a specific time yesterday, I would say "yesterday afternoon" or "yesterday evening". But I would say "last night" and wouldn't say "yesterday night"... and I have no idea why...
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    To my non-native ears, "yesterday night" sounds just fine. :D
    We don't use this. The reason is that a night is a period of darkness that crosses the boundary between two different days.

    In modern English the prefix 'yester' is very rare except in yesterday. You see it occasionally in a semi-poetic form, e.g. yesteryear, yesternight.

    ___________________________________________________________________________________
    Note

    'Yesterday night' could be rewritten 'yester day-night'. It is not at all clear what a 'day-night' is supposed to be. Neither would you say 'last day night' for the same reason.
     
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    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The ngram seems not to distinguish between "I saw him last night" and "The last night I saw him was the fourth of May."
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    It appears to me that English speakers in India and Sri Lanka do say "last morning." Several news articles use "last morning" to mean "yesterday morning" - some examples:

    "The incident occurred in the wee hours last morning when the victim, identified as Geeta alias Payal Biali Paswan, was sleeping at her house in Kamatnagar locality..."
    http://www.indiatvnews.com/crime/news/spurned-youth-murders-minor-girl-held-6625.html

    "It is determined by the number of people who grieved and shed tears while he was laid to rest earlier last morning."
    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mumbai/Vahanvati-had-an-innate-ability-to-take-on-naysayers/articleshow/41634838.cms


    http://www.dailymirror.lk/news/52473-police-hunt-lankan-men-over-stabbing-in-uk.html

    "The Ministry media release state that SLC President Jayantha Dharmadasa and Secretary Nishantha Ranatunga agreed to patch the difference that had arisen in recent times due to “miscommunication” between them over administration and management issues at SLC, following a meeting he had last morning with the two officials."
    http://www.dailymirror.lk/news/52441-minister-puts-disputed-memo-in-limbo.html
     
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