can make it

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vido

Senior Member
English
Is there a universal expression en français of "(can) make it" in the sense of "succeeded", "achieved", etc., as shown in the following examples?

1. I was supposed to have a meeting that day, but I wasn't able to make it because I had a traffic accident.

2. I bought you the movie ticket for tonight! Can you make it?

3. I made it to the top of the mountain! (= I reached the top of the mountain)

4. They made it half way through the trip. (= they completed half of the trip)

5. So you made it!! I'm glad you finally made it! (= (peut-être ;)) Now you have become the first female pilot to have crossed the pacific ocean!)

Merci d'avance! :)
 
  • LV4-26

    Senior Member
    1. je pouvais pas venir Je n'ai pas pu venir. Imparfait impossible here.
    2. Tu peux venir?:thumbsup:
    3. Not sure
    4. Not sure
    5. Tu y es! Je suis content que tu y es!
    You've got to have the subjonctive after content que ---> que tu y sois
    Various solutions according to the context, as Starcreator mentionned.
    Thus it can be pouvoir, arriver à, réussir à, [cela + être possible],.. .and a few others...

    1. Ce jour-là, je devais assister à une réunion mais ça n'a pas été possible parce que...OR
    1. J'avais une réunion ce jour-là mais je n'ai pas pu m'y rendre parce que...
    2. (alternative translations) C'est possible, pour toi ? or ça va être possible or, freer, c'est bon ? *
    3. J'ai réussi à atteindre le sommet de la montagne
    4. Not sure of the original meaning. Does it mean they've already completed half of the trip and their on their way to the second half ? (Or does it mean they've given up finishing the trip ?)
    In the first case you 'd say
    Ils ont fait la moitié du chemin.
    5. Alors, c'est fait ?! Je suis content que tu aies réussi.

    * ça va le faire ? would be a fairly direct (hence, interesting) translation for #2 but I'm afraid it's local dialect (Normandy)
     

    Clairedx

    New Member
    Suisse, Français
    In Switzerland, we also use "ça va le faire". But maybe you can say for the second sentence, "ca joue pour toi?".
     

    vido

    Senior Member
    English
    Merci à tous!! :) So, I'm sorry that there is not a universal way to express this as in English :( But in each case, we (you) made it :D
     

    Starcreator

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    LV4-26 said:
    Various solutions according to the context, as Starcreator mentionned.
    Thus it can be pouvoir, arriver à, réussir à, [cela + être possible],.. .and a few others...

    1. Ce jour-là, je devais assister à une réunion mais ça n'a pas été possible parce que...OR
    1. J'avais une réunion ce jour-là mais je n'ai pas pu m'y rendre parce que...
    2. (alternative translations) C'est possible, pour toi ? or ça va être possible or, freer, c'est bon ? *
    3. J'ai réussi à atteindre le sommet de la montagne
    4. Not sure of the original meaning. Does it mean they've already completed half of the trip and their on their way to the second half ? (Or does it mean they've given up finishing the trip ?)
    In the first case you 'd say
    Ils ont fait la moitié du chemin.
    5. Alors, c'est fait ?! Je suis content que tu aies réussi.

    * ça va le faire ? would be a fairly direct (hence, interesting) translation for #2 but I'm afraid it's local dialect (Normandy)
    :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

    All of them, well said. Just goes to show the value of a French native with regards to these matters...
     
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