Can prepositions define a special name?

Jawel7

Senior Member
Turkish
Hello everyone.
We can say: " I want a car with blue doors."
Here, "with blue doors" are identifying "a car" .
Is this also true for a special name such as "Istanbul, London.."

Example:
There is someone who doesn't know anything where London is.

Can I say: "Let's talk about London in England." ?
"in England" is defining "London" here. Is it correct?
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Yes. There's also a London in Canada, so you might need to use prepositions that way. We can also talk about the İstanbul of your childhood - it felt like a different city from the İstanbul of today.
     

    Jawel7

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Yes. There's also a London in Canada, so you might need to use prepositions that way. We can also talk about the İstanbul of your childhood - it felt like a different city from the İstanbul of today.
    Like saying "I want a car with blue doors." ,
    Do you think that it is also correct "Let's talk about Italy with many different museums"?
     

    Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    Like saying "I want a car with blue doors." ,
    Do you think that it is also correct "Let's talk about Italy with many different museums"?
    Yes, if there is more than one Italy in the world, or--which is a more likely scenario-- when you are talking about Italy in different times/ages and at one time Italy had many different museums as opposed to other times when it didn't have many different museums.


    I didn't know there was a London in Canada too. Thanks, ETB.
     

    Jawel7

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Yes, if there is more than one Italy in the world, or--which is a more likely scenario-- when you are talking about Italy in different times/ages and at one time Italy had many different museums as opposed to other times when it didn't have many different museums.


    I didn't know there was a London in Canada too. Thanks, ETB.
    Can not I just give an extra information about Italy? For example, The person whom I speak to doesn't know that Italy has many different museums, and to explain it, I say: "Let's talk about Italy with many different museums" ?
     

    Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    Can not I just give an extra information about Italy? For example, The person whom I speak to doesn't know that Italy has many different museums, and to explain it, I say: "Let's talk about Italy with many different museums" ?
    In that case, you'd say something like "... Italy, a country with many different museums."
     

    Jawel7

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    No.

    However, you might say "As a vacation destination, I would choose Italy, with its delicious food and its many different museums, instead of the Sahara Desert."
    I think the problem is connected to the preposition "with".
    What if I said:
    "Let's talk about Italy, in Europe
    or
    Let's talk about Italy, which is in Europe."
    ?
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I think the problem is connected to the preposition "with".
    Why do you see a problem? As noted, you can use "with."

    What if I said:
    "Let's talk about Italy, in Europe
    That would work if you were speaking to someone who might confuse it with another "Italy." For example, there actually is a town in Texas named "Italy"; it is roughly halfway between Waco and Fort Worth. Suppose someone started to tell you about that town, and you wanted to change the subject. You could certainly say "Let's not talk about Italy in Texas; let's talk about Italy in Europe."

    or
    Let's talk about Italy, which is in Europe."
    You could also say that, although the meaning is different. It sounds very much like something an elementary school teacher might say to her class when teaching them about the countries of the world, and where to find them on the map.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    We can say: " I want a car with blue doors."
    Here, "with blue doors" are identifying "a car" .
    Yes. [Preposition + noun/noun phrase or clause, preposition, or gerund] always produces a modifier.

    If the modifier is adjectival, then it specifies/identifies a general noun:

    I want a car with blue doors, not one with red doors.
    Is this also true for a special name such as "Istanbul,
    No, it is different. There is only one Istanbul, and therefore you should be careful how you qualify it.

    "And here is Istanbul with the blue doors" would be silly, as all cities have some blue doors and it would suggest that there were other Istanbuls.

    "And here is a photo of Istanbul with its Hagi Sofia" - here "with" would mean "together with" - this use of "with" is not a defining use.
     
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