Can "that" be omitted?

dewylotus

Senior Member
chinese
I have to learn english in school (that) I hate to learn. I know the rules of attributive clause,which say "that" can be omitted when it acts as object in the clause. But I somehow feel that in this sentence it's better not to omit it, or else it's likely to cause confusing.
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I'm afraid 'I have to learn English in school (that) I hate to learn.' sounds very odd, with or without 'that'. It's not something a native speaker would say.
     

    dewylotus

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thanks. I got it.But another question,
    But I somehow feel that in this sentence it's better to (<-->) not omit it, or else it's likely to cause confusing confusion.----------it's better not to omit / it's better to not omit, which one is correct? confused.:confused:
     

    exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    I have to learn english in school (that) I hate to learn. I know the rules of attributive clause,which say "that" can be omitted when it acts as object in the clause. But I somehow feel that in this sentence it's better not to omit it, or else it's likely to cause confusing.
    The right relative pronoun here is which, not that, standing for "to learn English": I have to learn English in school, which I hate. <--- I have to learn English in school. I hate to learn English.
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    "...... feel that in this sentence it's better to not omit it, ......"

    better + to
    not + omit
    :eek:

    Hau, you do know you're actively advising a learner of English to split infinitives? In many situations, "It's better not to omit..." will be considered vastly more correct than "It's better to not omit..." (The latter is fine for everyday conversation and informal communication, but any mid-level or formal writing should beware of splitting infinitives with "not.")
     

    Hau Ruck

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    :eek:

    Hau, you do know you're actively advising a learner of English to split infinitives? In many situations, "It's better not to omit..." will be considered vastly more correct than "It's better to not omit..." (The latter is fine for everyday conversation and informal communication, but any mid-level or formal writing should beware of splitting infinitives with "not.")
    "Ouch."

    I'd never, in my wildest dreams, say or write it in such a way.

    I see it as 'better' is coupled to 'to' and 'not' is coupled to 'omit'.

    (by the way - not splitting infinitives is by no means a 'rule' ;) ) Either way is quite fine; I assure you.

    "To boldly go where no man has gone before." ;)
     
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