can the word 'passe' be used on a person

iamconfused

Member
chinese
I was wondering if I can use the word 'passe' to describe a person being sort of no longer popular to look at or maybe no longer popular or something like that? For example(and just only an example), "Jennifer Lopez is passe, now all eyes are on Angelina Jolie." Are there other words I can also use to describe a person for the meaning I mentioned above? Thank you for your advice.
 
  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I was wondering if I can use the word 'passe' to describe a person being sort of no longer popular to look at or maybe no longer popular or something like that? For example(and just only an example), "Jennifer Lopez is passe, now all eyes are on Angelina Jolie."
    Yes, you can.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In my opinion the acute accent is required in English otherwise we tend to read it as 'pass' (I do anyway)

    "Jennifer Lopez is passé, now all eyes are on Angelina Jolie."
     

    iamconfused

    Member
    chinese
    Thanks Biffo, I know that. What I want to know is whether I can use the word to describe a person for the meaning I mentioned in my first post. Any other similar words to passé for conveying the same meaning to describe a person? Thanks.
     

    iamconfused

    Member
    chinese
    Thanks Parla. However about other words similar to passe that would convey the same meaning to describe a person as i mentioned in my first post? Thank you.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    In my opinion the acute accent is required in English otherwise we tend to read it as 'pass' (I do anyway)

    "Jennifer Lopez is passé, now all eyes are on Angelina Jolie."
    :thumbsup: The accent is most definitely required, as you say. Otherwise it would take me a few seconds (as it did now) to realise 'passe' was actually French and read it properly and get the meaning...

    (I never knew this French word was used in English, but it takes a lifetime to learn a few languages :D )
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Thanks Parla. However about other words similar to passé that would convey the same meaning to describe a person as I mentioned in my first post?
    One current, informal way of saying it: "She is so last year." (Or last month, or last week.) This expression reflects how rapidly public fads and affections change.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    One current, informal way of saying it: "She is so last year." (Or last month, or last week.) This expression reflects how rapidly public fads and affections change.
    True, but in my understanding "so passé" is hugely more insulting than these alternatives.
    I think that is because "so passé" is a more sophisticated term, likely to be said by someone whose opinion, in this particular rarified world, counts for more.
     

    le Grand Soir

    Senior Member
    Anglais, dialecte de San Francisco
    I was admonished on this site for using the word "képi" because it is French. How is this use of passé any different? I am puzzled about the rules for English only. Do they apply sometimes and not others?
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I was admonished on this site for using the word "képi" because it is French. How is this use of passé any different? I am puzzled about the rules for English only. Do they apply sometimes and not others?
    If a non-English word is generally accepted as having been embraced as English, then it may be used freely in this forum. There is no doubt that passé is accepted as an English word - see passe.
    I think I have found the post you are referring to. It now has a link to the relevant WR English dictionary entry - see kepi.
     
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