Can this meaning in "willing" become a usage in "willingness"?

istudyeng3465

Senior Member
Korean
Hi, I was searching the meaning of the word "willingness". Then I found two meaning of "willing" on MW dictionary but I wonder if second one can mean as "willingness".
1 : inclined or favorably disposed in mind : READY
3 : done, borne, or accepted by choice or without reluctance (Merriam Webster Dictionary)
And this is sentence I had wonder the meaning of a word.
The willingness of a Wall Street investment bank to pay me hundreds of thousands of dollars to dispense investment advice to grown-ups remains a mystery to me to this day.—The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine by Michael Lewis—
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Here, the meaning of "willingness" clearly refers to definition 3 of "willing" that you quote. The bank did pay the writer hundreds of thousands of dollars without reluctance.
     

    istudyeng3465

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Here, the meaning of "willingness" clearly refers to definition 3 of "willing" that you quote. The bank did pay the writer hundreds of thousands of dollars without reluctance.
    Oh my lord, I thought it was him getting kind of a job offer after he has stumbled out Salomon Brothers but it meant while he was in there :eek:
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Oh my lord, I thought it was him getting kind of a job offer after he has stumbled out Salomon Brothers the whole time:eek:
    I might have misunderstood the meaning from just this one sentence. It is possible that the speaker was referring to a job offer (or offer of a contract) rather than to actually being paid by the bank; the same wording would be used for both situations.
     

    istudyeng3465

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I might have misunderstood the meaning from just this one sentence. It is possible that the speaker was referring to a job offer (or offer of a contract) rather than to actually being paid by the bank; the same wording would be used for both situations.
    Hm, also I thought of "advice" as just normal advice but now I get what advice they were "willing" to pay hundreds of thousands money for.
     
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    istudyeng3465

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I wonder the usage of "willing" because, what if they were inclined or favorably disposed to pay even if they actually paid him?
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I wonder the usage of "willing" because, what if they were inclined or favorably disposed to pay even if they actually paid him?
    Yes. "Willing" in itself does not say whether he was paid or not. In post #2 I only imagined one situation, but it is possible that the sentence referred to a different situation in which he didn't give advice and therefore was not paid.
     
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