Can we analyze “to protect his country's southern border” as the non-finite clause of “the military”?

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Curiosity777

Senior Member
Korean
◈ Trump announced yesterday that he intended to deploy the military to protect his country's southern border

I want to know whether the bold part can be analyzed as the non-finite clause of "the military".

I guess it can be in the same way as in "I want him to lend me some money"

(Here, "to lend me some money" is modifying "him" as a non-finite clause)

So, I think the sentence can mean, according to my analyzing, "Trump announced yesterday that he intended to deploy the military so that the military can protect his country's southern border".
 
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  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Do you think "deploy the military" and "have them protect the border" are 2 different actions? I don't think so. I think in this sentence "deploy" means "use". There is only 1 action: Trump sending soldiers (a portion of the military) to the southern border, for the purpose of protecting the US at its border.

    If your thought is that "deploy them to protect" is similar to "have them protect" then I agree. "Deploy" acts a causative verb.

    Sentence: I want him to lend me some money.

    (Here, "to lend me some money" is modifying "him" as a non-finite clause)
    I disagree with that. "to lend me money" does not describe "him" in any way. It describes "the action I want".
     

    billj

    Senior Member
    British English
    ◈ Trump announced yesterday that he intended to deploy the military to protect his country's southern border

    I want to know whether the bold part can be analyzed as the non-finite clause of "the military".

    I guess it can be in the same way as in "I want him to lend me some money"

    (Here, "to lend me some money" is modifying "him" as a non-finite clause)

    So, I think the sentence can mean, according to my analyzing, "Trump announced yesterday that he intended to deploy the military so that the military can protect his country's southern border".
    The infinitival clause to protect his country's southern border is a purpose adjunct. It doesn't modify "military", but functions as a modifier in clause structure.

    Note that "in order" can be added: ... in order to protect his country's southern border.

    In your other example, the infinitival clause "to lend me some money" is not modifying "him", but is a complement of "want".
     
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    Curiosity777

    Senior Member
    Korean
    The infinitival clause to protect his country's southern border is a purpose adjunct. It doesn't modify "military", but functions as a modifier in clause structure.

    Note that "in order" can be added: ... in order to protect his country's border.

    In your other example, the infinitival clause "to lend him some money" is not modifying "him", but is a complement of "want".
    Then, do you disagree with dojibear's answer that "deploy" acts a causative verb?
     

    billj

    Senior Member
    British English
    Then, do you disagree with dojibear's answer that "deploy" acts a causative verb?
    Non-finite clauses headed by verbs of causation function as complements, not adjuncts, cf. I got them to talk, where the infinitival "to talk" is complement of "got".
     
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