Can we call 'rather' as an 'emotional' adverb?

netcrawler

Member
Russian-Ukraine
Reading about the adverb "rather" I've noticed that that adverb is used as a kind of emotional one.

1. A: Can you help me? B: Sorry, I'm rather busy. (B is slightly dissatisfied)
2. A: Here I am. B: You were rather slow. (B is slightly dissatisfied)
3. I've watched the Warcraft movie. It is rather interesting! (That was unexpected and was said with surprise)
 
  • Warped

    Senior Member
    Finnish, Swedish
    I don't know about the emotional adverb concept, but the adverb "rather" in these examples strengthens the adjectives. It can mean "a bit, quite, fairly," and so on.
     

    netcrawler

    Member
    Russian-Ukraine
    I don't know about the emotional adverb concept, but the adverb "rather" in these examples strengthens the adjectives. It can mean "a bit, quite, fairly," and so on.
    I mean that as a rule we use rather when we are surprised, when something is unexpected, when there is something that could dissatisfy or disappoint. And therefore we don't say that neutrally but with emotions.
     

    Warped

    Senior Member
    Finnish, Swedish
    That might actually be true, and so a native speaker could maybe confirm this because one should have more experience in the daily use of these words.
     
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