Can we say REBOUND on a quiz show?

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kuleshov

Senior Member
Spain Spanish
Imagine two people are competing on a quiz show. They have to answer ten questions each in turns, but if one of them fails to anwer the question in their turn, the other contestant can answer and get an extra point.

If contestant number 1 fails to answer one question, can the presenter say something like REBOUND or THERE'S A REBOUND?

If not, do presenters use any special word or expression to refer to this situation on TV quizzes??

Cheers :):D:confused:;)
 
  • Wobby

    Senior Member
    English [England]
    I can't see why such a phrase couldn't be coined if a new quiz show were to be created, but currently, no such show exists, hence people would not know what it means without context.

    I think typically, the presenter would say 'I have to pass the question on to the other contestant (because you failed to answer it in time)', or 'the question passes/is passed on to the other contestant' - some sort of usage of 'to pass on'. I can't think of another right now... perhaps someone who has watched more quiz shows than me will be able to think of a more succinct way of saying it. :)
     

    Spagbol

    Member
    England, English (UK)
    I have never heard the word "rebound" used in this way. Usually the question is "handed over" to the other team.
     

    Gwan

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    It would be possible. Literally 'rebound' means that a ball bounces back up in the direction it came from, so figuratively it is any situation that comes back upon the orginal protagonist (sorry I can't think of a better word than protagonist - the person who performed the action in the first place). So a rebound may be if A was asked the original question, couldn't answer and passed to B, perhaps B couldn't answer either and the question rebounded back to A. I've never heard it used this way, however. There is probably a word used for the situation you're describing, but I can't think of it. The presenter could just say 'the question passes to B' or 'it's B's turn'.
    On a side-note, we also use 'rebound' to refer to the situation where you end a relationship with one person and then quickly begin a relationship with someone else. It's often called a 'rebound relationship' or 'being on the rebound'.
     

    kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    Have you ever heard a noun from one of those verbs: hand over or pass on?; I mean the same way you can say a handover of prisoners for example. As you know, English is quite flexible and creates new words constantly.

    The question now is: Do TV quiz show presenters always use a verb in that situation or have you ever heard them using a noun, kind of "There's a "handover"."

    We need TV quiz shows buffs!!!!

    Cheers.
     

    1337pino

    New Member
    United States / English
    In the game show "Family Feud," a team has a chance to "steal" when the other team fails to complete the round.
     

    Wobby

    Senior Member
    English [England]
    "Handover", again would make sense, but it does not currently exist. :)

    "Pass" by itself can't be used, as it has connotations of skipping the question.

    1337pino has a point - here, we have a gameshow called "Family Fortunes" (perhaps it is the same show?), and one team has the chance to steal the points that the other team won for that round, as well as the points they earn with the answer they give (there are a range of answers), and the presenter may say "Chance to steal!" So, I guess you could use it loosely to suggest that the contestant has their chance to steal the points that the other contestant had the opportunity to get. :D
     

    kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    My question was not based on any actual quiz show. When I was I child I used to watch TV quizzes and I've always wanted to know what to say in that situation in English. That's the sort of answers you cannot get in dictionaries.

    Thanks.
     
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