can we say "repeat it again"?

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi, it's said that the word "repeat" can't be followed by "again". But if we have repeat something once, can we say "repeat it again" when we want somebody to repeat something a second time? In this case "repeat it again" means "repeat it a second time", which emphasize "a second time". If not in this way, we have to only say "repeat",everytime something is repeated.( for example, if my kids finish reading a word, I say "repeat", then the do it. Then I say "repeat" again, they do it again,and so on.Every time I can only say "repeat". It's so dull.)
Thanks
 
  • Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Hello,

    Yes, it can be phrased this way, exactly for the reasons you are giving (i.e. to stress the repetition).
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Instead of Repeat, you can simply say Again. Seriously.

    Say the word metamorphosis.
    Repeat it.
    Again.
    Again.
    Again.
    That's perfect.


    As for saying "Repeat it again," while it may be technically redundant, you hear it all the time. It doesn't make me wince.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    That's indeed a perfect way! Thank you very much!!! ( I don't know if "Thank you very much" here is "off-topic". But I hope it will not, so that we can express our gratitude)
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thank yous are the only payment members receive on WordReference, so they're very welcome. Interestingly though, we discourage You're welcomes for taking up too much space in the thread, so you'll just have to imagine us saying You're welcome because you are. :)
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    For stylistic variation, you can also try 'And again', 'And once more', 'And yet once more', 'And last time'! :D

    (I'm accustomed to the and - sometimes stressed and elongated, sometimes short and light - but obviously it's optional.)
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    I hope you'll excuse me being nitpicky :eek:, but you say/write 'Thank you.' The 's' found in 'Thank yous' in one of the previous posts was added as a mark of plural, i.e. of instances when the actual phrase 'Thank you.' is offered to WRF members.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi, it's said that the word "repeat" can't be followed by "again". But if we have repeat something once, can we say "repeat it again" when we want somebody to repeat something a second time? In this case "repeat it again" means "repeat it a second time", which emphasize "a second time". If not in this way, we have to only say "repeat",everytime something is repeated.( for example, if my kids finish reading a word, I say "repeat", then the do it. Then I say "repeat" again, they do it again,and so on.Every time I can only say "repeat". It's so dull.)
    Thanks
    Saying 'repeat it again' is to commit a pleonasm, as the idea of doing it again is present in the word repeat.

    Play it again, Sam.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I hope you'll excuse me being nitpicky :eek:, but you say/write 'Thank you.' The 's' found in 'Thank yous' in one of the previous posts was added as a mark of plural, i.e. of instances when the actual phrase 'Thank you.' is offered to WRF members.
    There's every chance longxianchen knows that and is just playing with the language, but only he can verify that. In any case, I found Thank yous charming because there was one for each of us. :) But your comment isn't amiss for those who don't realize. Thank you.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you!! But just now, another western friend told me as the following:

    Me: How many flies does it take to carry a pea from Bangor to Bognor?
    You: Would you repeat the question please? << Here, repeat again would be wrong.
    Me: How many flies does it take to carry a pea from Bangor to Bognor?
    You: Would you mind repeating that again?(right)
    Me: How many flies does it take to carry a pea from Bangor to Bognor?
     
    Last edited:

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Me: How many flies does it take to carry a pea from Bangor to Bognor?
    You: Would you repeat the question please? << Here, repeat again would be wrong.
    Me: How many flies does it take to carry a pea from Bangor to Bognor?
    You: Would you mind repeating that again?(right)
    Me: How many flies does it take to carry a pea from Bangor to Bognor?
    The question is, what does 'that' in line 4 refer to?

    Answer: the sentence in line 3 (not line 1).
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Sam can play it once, but if he plays it again, he will have repeated it once.
    If he repeats it twice, he will have played it three times.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    It is not always redundant.

    Mike: Repeat that please.

    Ellen: I already repeated it twice.

    Mike: Well then, repeat it again.

     
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