Can/will be able to

Vsevolod

Senior Member
Russian
Good morning everyone!

What do you think of the following sentences?

1) When Barclays opens a branch in our town, [you'll be able / can] exchange money there.

2) When Barclays opens a branch in our town, [you'll be able / can] use them to do your brokerage thing.

3) When Barclays opens a branch in our town, [you'll be able / can] to apply for a job there.

Does "can" look equally natural here?

Thank you in advance!

Seva☘
 
  • DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    In my opinion you need the future tense in all three: "you'll be able to...".

    The present tense "can" would only work if the branch were already open.
     

    Linguisticks

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    Vsevolod, your bracketed examples are confusing. It should be [you'll be able / you can] in all three examples. And as DonnyB suggests, you do need "you'll be able to" in all three.
     

    Vsevolod

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Hm...in my previous thread:

    https:/forum.wordreference.com/threads/can-or-be-able-to-in-the-future.3626301/#post-1847635

    The use of "can" in Ex.4 seems to have been approved, yet it strikingly resembles 3) in this thread...am I missing something?:(
     

    tunaafi

    Senior Member
    English - British (Southern England)
    If you are referring to this exchange in the other thread,

    A: Can I download my favourite song?
    B: Fine, when they fix the connection, you can download your dreadful song.(Permission. Only "can" is possible)


    you'll see that 'can' is used there for permission. This is not the case in sentence #3 in this thread.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    1) When Barclays opens a branch in our town, you can exchange money there.

    2) When Barclays opens a branch in our town, you can use them to do your brokerage thing.

    3) When Barclays opens a branch in our town, you can apply for a job there.


    These all sound perfectly normal to me. For me, there is a slight stylistic nuance compared to will be able to - maybe they sound terse and maybe even a fraction dismissive or tetchy (Then you won't have to bother me all the time.)
     
    Last edited:

    Vsevolod

    Senior Member
    Russian
    If you are referring to this exchange in the other thread,

    A: Can I download my favourite song?
    B: Fine, when they fix the connection, you can download your dreadful song.(Permission. Only "can" is possible)


    you'll see that 'can' is used there for permission. This is not the case in sentence #3 in this thread.
    Not exactly, I was talking about this one:

    Ex. 4

    A: I want to work in The entertainment industry.
    B: When they finish the construction of the amusement park you [can / will be able to] apply for a job there.

    Everybody accepted it as natural, while #3 in this thread was mostly rejected. What difference is there between them?
     

    Vsevolod

    Senior Member
    Russian
    To me these sentences seem perfectly acceptable with an inverted clause order:

    When Barclays opens a branch in our town, you can apply for a job there.

    You can apply to Barclays when they open a branch in our town (suggestion).


    What do you think?
     
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