Can you say a bad-looking guy as opposed to a smart dressed one?

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anapt

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spanish-spain
Can you say a bad-looking guy as opposed to a smart dressed one?
 
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  • William Stein

    Senior Member
    American English
    No, the opposed of "smart-dressed" is "sloppily dressed" or just "sloppy-looking".
    It's funny but people only use "bad looking" in the negative: "He's not bad-looking" (=he's pretty good-looking), never "He's bad-looking"
     

    anapt

    New Member
    spanish-spain
    I know I could say scruffy but I was wondering if good-looking can be used with clothes too. thanks
     

    William Stein

    Senior Member
    American English
    I know I could say scruffy but I was wondering if good-looking can be used with clothes too. thanks
    Scruffy's a good word but it's a little different from sloppy. A rich kid can be "sloppy" if he doesn't tuck in his shirt, for example, but only a poor kid can be "scruffy" (old dirty, raggedy clothes, unshaven (for men of course!), unwashed).
     
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    Cat Qué Caos

    Member
    English - Canada
    When talking about clothes:

    Positive: he's smartly-dressed, he looks smart, he's well-dressed, he cleans up good (muy coloquial)

    Negative: he's sloppily-dressed, he's poorly-dressed, he's unkempt, he looks like something the cat dragged in :)
     

    William Stein

    Senior Member
    American English
    When talking about clothes:

    Positive: he's smartly-dressed, he looks smart, he's well-dressed, he cleans up good (muy coloquial)

    Negative: he's sloppily-dressed, he's poorly-dressed, he's unkempt, he looks like something the cat dragged in :)
    How do you say all that in Spanish, though? Rubns is right, this is supposed to be a SP-EN forum.

    Vox has "desaliñado" for sloppy but I've never heard anybody say that here. I think they say "se viste como un chancho" (= puerco) or "anda todo desarreglado"
     
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    William Stein

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think "desaliñado" is the word I'd use.
    Do you know the distinction between "sloppy" (like an executive who gets dressed in a hurry and whose tie is not tied right or his cuffs aren't buttoned = desarreglado?) and scruffy/slovenly (dirty, torn cloths, unshaven, like somebody who hasn't slept indoors for a few days) = haraposo? How do you use "dejado"?
     

    Cbes

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Argentina
    I think "desaliñado" is the word I'd use.
    Also "desarreglado" o "mal vestido", never "pobremente vestido" or something like that.
    And what about "sharp dressed man"? (ZZ Top song) I don't see this option written above, is not usual?
    Cheers
     

    aldonzalorenzo

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Do you know the distinction between "sloppy" (like an executive who gets dressed in a hurry and whose tie is not tied right or his cuffs aren't buttoned = desarreglado?) and scruffy/slovenly (dirty, torn cloths, unshaven, like somebody who hasn't slept indoors for a few days) = haraposo? How do you use "dejado"?
    Nunca antes había pensado estas cosas, pero yo entiendo sloppy como desaliñado = desarreglado = dejado (en el vestir). Puede ser una persona con muy buena pinta, y con ropa cara, pero que es descuidada en el vestir. De estas tres palabras, tal vez "desaliñado" sea la más fuerte.
    Para scruffy diría andrajoso o harapiento. Y tal vez zarrapastroso.

    Si digo que alguien simplemente es "dejado" no lo entiendo necesariamente referido a la ropa: puede ser dejado porque se deja estar, por ejemplo, en ir al médico.

    Also "desarreglado" o "mal vestido", never "pobremente vestido" or something like that.
    Para mí alguien mal vestido es alguien que no tiene gusto para vestir: puede ir arreglado pero mal.
     

    William Stein

    Senior Member
    American English
    Para scruffy diría andrajoso o harapiento. Y tal vez zarrapastroso.
    Voy a anotarlas, son buenas palabras literarias.

    Si digo que alguien simplemente es "dejado" no lo entiendo necesariamente referido a la ropa: puede ser dejado porque se deja estar, por ejemplo, en ir al médico.

    En inglés: somebody who lets himself go

    And what about "sharp dressed man"? (ZZ Top song) I don't see this option written above, is not usual?
    Cheers
    "He's a sharp dresser" is pretty common. How ironic that ZZ Top would have a song like that, they seem like the typical Texan biker types who would sooner die than wear a suit!
     
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    frida-nc

    Senior Member
    English USA
    Hello anapt, welcome to the forum.
    Everyone had to guess what you meant in this thread, because you did not say what the Spanish term you were translating was (desaliñado? mal vestido?)
    Please make sure that your vocatulary consultations involve a translation from one language to the other (as Rubns mentioned), so that we all learn.
    This thread will be closed and eventually withdrawn.
    Sorry for the inconvenience.
    Please have a look at our Rules, and other conventions of the forum discussed in the linked thread. Thanks.
     
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