Candies and sweets

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  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Also, AmE candy includes chocolates, whereas BrE sweet does not; so a candy bar (AmE) is a chocolate bar (BrE/AmE). And sweet can be used to refer to dessert (or BrE pudding), whereas candy cannot. And AmE cotton candy translates as BrE candy floss (so candy is not exclusively AmE).
     

    mikichan

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I've read other threads but couldn't find the answer.


    The dictionary says for sweet “(often plural) a pleasurable experience, state, etc: the sweets of success.”, but is that the only thing "sweets" means in AE? Does "sweets" can mean something that taste sweet at all?

    Thank you.
     
    Last edited:

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    I've read other threads but couldn't find the answer.


    The dictionary says for sweet “(often plural) a pleasurable experience, state, etc: the sweets of success.”, but is that the only thing "sweets" means in AE? Does "sweets" can mean something that taste sweet at all?

    Thank you.
    Hi mikichan,

    First of all, "the sweets of success" sounds pretty unusual to me. "Sweets" certainly isn't used this way in everyday AE.

    As far as other uses of "sweet" or "sweets" goes, I do hear it sometimes as a synonym for "dessert." E.g., I skipped having an appetizer so that I'd have room for a sweet.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    "Sweets" is used in AE, just not as a synonym for candy. From the American Heritage Dictionary: "sweets a. Foods, such as candy, pastries, puddings, or preserves, that are high in sugar content. b. Informal Sweet potatoes: candied sweets."

    Example: Dentists advise us not to eat too many sweets, as sugar causes tooth decay.
     

    mikichan

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Hi Copyright.


    Which dictionary did you find "the sweets of success" in? That sounds very odd.

    Actually, it is the dictionary of this site...I could not tell if it was unusual.
    http://www.wordreference.com/definition/sweet


    Thank you theartichoke and Parla. I didn't know "sweets" mean almost the same as "dessert", just not limited to the sweet food served after meal and not fruits.


    Do AE speakers use "sweet" in the singular to mean the same as "AE sweets" as something sweet to the taste, such as candy, pastries, puddings, or preserves, that are high in sugar content ?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Actually, it is the dictionary of this site...I could not tell if it was unusual.
    http://www.wordreference.com/definition/sweet
    (often plural) a pleasurable experience, state, etc: the sweets of success
    Interesting. I've never seen it used that way. The OED has several examples, but none more recent than 1861.
    I found one example in the British National Corpus
    Photography. Hemel Hempstead: Argus Specialist Publications, 1990 - ‘High-spirited slum children, a tired ballet dancer, a work face imprinted with the sweets of life and wisdom, a miner proud as a nobleman, these were some of his favourite subjects’ said Stanley Turner, of the University of Dundee, the Trustees of the Peto legacy.
     

    mikichan

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thank you, Andygc.

    If there is any AE speakers who reads this post, could you tell me if AE speakers use "sweet" in the singular to mean the same as "AE sweets" as something sweet to the taste, such as candy, pastries, puddings, or preserves, that are high in sugar content ?

    Thank you.
     
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