capable to/from

macta123

Senior Member
India,Hindi
Are they equally correct in English

Capable to
Capable from

As far as I know
Capable from + verb (gerund)
Capable to + verb (root form/infintive)


Thanks in advance!
 
  • french4beth

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Usually, "capable of" is used; I speak English well, I am capable of communicating in English.

    "Capable to" is usually part of an infinitive verbal phrase, such as "Is certification enough to make you capable to work in an actual environment?"

    "Capable from" is usually part of a prepositional phrase: "He was capable from the age of 1 years old of carrying on a conversation."
     

    lexicalia

    Member
    American English
    "Capable from" is usually part of a prepositional phrase: "He was capable from the age of 1 years old of carrying on a conversation."
    Besides this clever sentence, I would not be capable of finding a use for "capable from". As far as I know, "from" is simply the wrong preposition to use with "capable".
     

    paperclip013

    Member
    Bulgarian, Bulgaria
    Hello, hola y salut,

    I agree with Lexicalia. "Capable" as an adjective is followed by the preposition of + gerund. For instance:

    She is quite capable of taking care of her disabled sister.

    Capable may also be used with nouns:

    She is quite capable of profound treachery.

    Best,

    Paperclip013
     
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