Caparrassa

< Previous | Next >

UUBiker

Senior Member
United States, English
I'm reading an "erotic" story in a collection of Catalan-language writings called Onze pometes té el pomer. Let me first say that this is not an assignment for any class. I am not enrolled in any school of any description. In a story by Jordi Dausà, entitled "Chi," (as in the Chinese concept of energy), he describes the protagonist as suffering the day after a night of debauchery with "una boca pastosa" (obvious enough, this isn't my question) and "una sensació lleugera de nàusea," (again, obvious enough, and likewise not my question; I add these merely as context) not to mention various feelings of guilt. He also awakes "amb caparrassa," which I take to mean, by way of the context in which it occurs, either something close to "mal de cap" (or is that "maldecap") or a hangover. And doesn't "caparras" itself mean something that I can't quite put my finger on-- big-headedness, stubborness, something of that sort? That doesn't fit here, but I'm wondering all that same.

Thank you.
 
  • betulina

    Senior Member
    català - Catalunya
    Hi, UUBiker,

    I had never seen or heard caparrassa before, and in your context I would understand the same as you. It's not in the "official" dictionary, but it is in this one (which I would define as "descriptive") and it confirms what you supposed:

    CAPARRASSA f.
    Cap dolorit o feixuc, que no pot coordinar bé les idees (Gir., Empordà).
    It's not exactly "mal de cap" ("maldecap" would be a headache meaning 'worry, concern'), but the sensation you get with a hangover, I guess. Let's wait for someone who uses it, though.

    About caparràs, I don't use it either, but I would understand "big head". In the dictionary you'll find it means "big head" and "a wise person".

    Hope that helps.
    :)
     

    UUBiker

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    Well, that's odd, I had actually looked for caparrassa in the IEC dictionary but had not found it originally. The definition still seems, well, a bit vague. I wonder what the "register" of the word is. The IEC dictionary marks the word as "Girona, Empordà." As far as I can tell, our Mr. Dausà may be from Organyà (whose inhabitants, oddly, are called "ganxos"), a small town in the Alt Urgell, in Lleida, as he won a literary prize there. If indeed Dausà is a ganxo, that would at least be in the right direction-- vaguely north, and it would explain his use of (this apparently dialectal) word.
     

    Interfecte

    Member
    Catalan, also Spanish
    I heard this word, caparrassa, from my mother and from my grandmother, and also the word caparra (http://ec.grec.net/lexicx.jsp?GECART=0025545). They are from the Empordà and from a village near Girona. And I don't think they use it to herselfs for a hangover (they don't drink at all). The sense it's more for a sensation like a vague headache, but the origin could be a hangover too, why not?
     

    Heiwajin

    Senior Member
    Catalonia/Spain (Spanish-Catalan)
    The IEC dictionary marks the word as "Girona, Empordà." As far as I can tell, our Mr. Dausà may be from Organyà (whose inhabitants, oddly, are called "ganxos"), a small town in the Alt Urgell, in Lleida, as he won a literary prize there. If indeed Dausà is a ganxo, that would at least be in the right direction-- vaguely north, and it would explain his use of (this apparently dialectal) word.
    Hi all,

    Just adding a little bit of information. Jordi Dausà is from Cassà de la Selva, Gironès. I just checked out since, although, as you did point out, Empordà and Alt Urgell are "comarques" that are "vaguely" north (and so is el Gironès), they don't share dialect at all, and even belong to the two main different catalan dialect groups: català oriental (Empordà, Gironès) and català occidental (Urgell). He just happened to win a literary prize, in a village where, by the way, the oldest document ever written in Catalan language was found.

    Nothing to add to the "caparrasa" meaning, I never heard of it.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top