captioned case

Corazón Tricolor

Senior Member
Colombian Spanish/US English/French
Queridos foreros:
El contexto es el siguiente (tomado de una simple carta escrita por un juez):

"[...] Please find and encloped copy of X filed with the Court in connection with the above captioned case".

Now, I understand that what [they] are referring to is the aforementioned, or the case which we are talking about.

I just wanted to make sure that there is no legal sub-meaning that may affect the meaning of the word "captioned". Does this entail a particular nuance, for example, has the case been closed, or at a particular stage?

Y en español... el caso en cuestión, el anterior caso.

¿Comentarios? ¡Mil gracias! Saludos.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Iuris Tantum

    Banned
    Mexican Spanish
    Captioned case se refiere al caso identificado "al rubro".

    Al menos de los que conozco, todos los expedientes se identifican por un "rubro", que contiene, regularmente, las partes contendientes, el tipo de juicio, el número de expediente . Algo así:

    MR. BEAN
    VS.
    HARRY POTTER
    JUICIO ORDINARIO CIVIL
    EXP. NUM. 1234 /2010

    Ese rubro debe ponerse en cada escrito que se presenta ante el Juzgado.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    RicardoElAbogado

    Senior Member
    American English
    Does this entail a particular nuance, for example, has the case been closed, or at a particular stage?

    No. In probably every court in the US, the papers filed with the court have to have a caption on the first page, which (as Iuris indicated) lists the court, the names of the parties (typically only the first party on each side), the case no., etc.

    So your understanding is correct that in this context, "above captioned case" simply means what you thought it meant (e.g., the case referred to above).
     

    Michelle Jang

    Member
    Korean & Brazilian Portuguese
    ¿Y cómo se traduce al español?: Above captioned case.

    ¿La causa mencionada arriba? ¿El caso en cuestión?

    ¡¡Gracias!!
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    David

    Banned
    Michelle Jang has repeated (#5) a question first raised more than five years ago by Corazon Tricolor. Iuris Tantum answered it correctly in #2. The general comment supplied in #3 is in my view to assisting with translation, the purpose of this forum, and the suggestion "la causa mencionada anteriormente" though more or less equivalent, but not a direct translation into Spanish of the formal English phrase "above-captioned case." I disagree with Softrans, as this suggested translation implies that "la causa mencionada anteriormente" implies a reference to a different matter, not the present litigation.

    The translation should be la demanda referida al rubro, or la demanda identificada al rubro, or, if the document --Michelle Jang provides no context, essential for translation-- using the phrase "the above-captioned case" is one filed in the same case, you could say "la presente causa." Note that caso and case have different meanings in Sp. and Eng., respectively.
     

    CHOCHIN

    Member
    spanish-guatemala
    Michelle Jang has repeated (#5) a question first raised more than five years ago by Corazon Tricolor. Iuris Tantum answered it correctly in #2. The general comment supplied in #3 is in my view to assisting with translation, the purpose of this forum, and the suggestion "la causa mencionada anteriormente" though more or less equivalent, but not a direct translation into Spanish of the formal English phrase "above-captioned case." I disagree with Softrans, as this suggested translation implies that "la causa mencionada anteriormente" implies a reference to a different matter, not the present litigation.

    The translation should be la demanda referida al rubro, or la demanda identificada al rubro, or, if the document --Michelle Jang provides no context, essential for translation-- using the phrase "the above-captioned case" is one filed in the same case, you could say "la presente causa." Note that caso and case have different meanings in Sp. and Eng., respectively.
    Excellent!
     
    Top