cardinal numbers

Honeyduke

Senior Member
England, English
I would like to say, in russian;

'I have one stamp and two postcards'

I know that 'stamp' is the object and should go into the accusative case, however as it is preceded by 'one' should it be in the nominative? Also, as postcard is preceded by 'two' should it be in the genetive singular rather than the accusative? Any help would be appreciated x x
 
  • clapec

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I would say: "у меня есть одна (nominative case, fem.) почтовая марка (nominative case, fem.) и две (nominative case, fem.) открытки (genitive case, singular)". Anyway, I have not practiced my Russian for a while, so I think it would be better to wait for native speakers ;)
     

    cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    clapec said:
    I would say: "у меня есть одна (nominative case, fem.) почтовая марка (nominative case, fem.) и две (nominative case, fem.) открытки (genitive nominative case, singular plural)". Anyway, I have not practiced my Russian for a while, so I think it would be better to wait for native speakers ;)

    You got it all right, clapec, except for one small thing: открытки is nominative plural, as is every noun after cardinals два/две, три, четыре. Starting with пять it's genitive plural: пять открыток.

    Also compare: двадцать две открытки, двадцать пять открыток.
     

    northernmonkey

    New Member
    English
    cyanista said:
    You got it all right, clapec, except for one small thing: открытки is nominative plural, as is every noun after cardinals два/две, три, четыре. Starting with пять it's genitive plural: пять открыток.

    Also compare: двадцать две открытки, двадцать пять открыток.



    Clarec was right the first time.

    Here is an example....

    Один студент - Nominative Singular Noun
    Два студента - Genitive Singular Noun
    Пять студентов - Genitive Plural Noun
    Эти студенты - Nominative Plural Noun

    I think the confusion is that it is a Feminine noun.

    I'm fairly sure that this is a correct example...

    Одна студентка
    Две студентки -*note*
    Пять студенток
    Эти студентки - *note*

    You will see that 'Two Students' and 'These Students' have the same ending, but in fact they are using different cases.
     

    cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    D'oh! :)

    Thank you very much for your comment, northernmonkey! You are absolutely right. Clapec, forgive me if you can! :eek:

    I was indeed mislead by the homonymous forms of a feminine noun in the genitive singular and nominative plural. My subconsciousness probably refused to accept the that a noun after "two" can be in singular - I still find it beyond all common sense. :) But it's a fact, so I edit my statement as follows:

    "открытки" in the abovementioned example is genitive singular, as is every noun after cardinals два/две, три, четыре. Starting with пять it's genitive plural: пять открыток.
     

    northernmonkey

    New Member
    English
    Hehe,

    That's the bad thing about being a native speaker... There are no rules in your head, whereas, to me, the Russian Language is just one VERY BIG and ОЧЕНь ОЧЕНь СЛОЖНАЯ rule book!

    If you were to ask me to tell me why we use the 'past perfect progressive' instead of the 'past perfect simple'... i would say 'I HAVE NO IDEA!'

    :D

    PS. yes i agree, i have noooooooooooooooo idea why 'two', 'three' and 'four' are considered to be 'semi-singular'. this completely confused me when i first started learning!
     

    cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    Welcome to the forums, northernmonkey! Hope we'll soon have ground for more fruitful discussions! ;)

    northernmonkey said:
    PS. yes i agree, i have noooooooooooooooo idea why 'two', 'three' and 'four' are considered to be 'semi-singular'. this completely confused me when i first started learning!
    I've done some research and found out that it has something to do with the ancient dual form that became obsolete as early as 16th century and was later perceived as genitive singular because of their likeness. For some reason it was adopted for three and four as well.

    Those willing to read the Russian article about it will find it here (the very bottom of the page).
     
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