Caro mio

flirtingwdisaster

New Member
USA
English, USA
I've searched it, but haven't found the answer I'm looking for. Is "caro mio" the equivalent to "my dear" that you would say to a male? I am wanting to say "Caro mio, ti voglio bene" to a male, if that helps. Also, does "ti amo" change when saying it to a male?
 
  • MAVERIK

    Senior Member
    Italy Italian
    Yes , it is the literal translation. But you can also say " tesoro io / amore mio " . It works both for a male and a female.
     

    flirtingwdisaster

    New Member
    USA
    English, USA
    Thank you! So, I've read that "ti voglio bene" and "ti amo" both mean "I love you" in different ways, but "ti voglio bene" also has different meanings. Would "Caro mio, ti voglio bene. Ti amo" sound redundant? Could that be "My dear, I want you/I care for you. I love you"?
     

    MAVERIK

    Senior Member
    Italy Italian
    It might be too redudant , it depends on the context. It is true that " Ti voglio bene " and " Ti amo" in English is the same , I mean , "I love you". It also might be " Honey , I want you / I care of you /I love you " that is in Italian " Tesoro , Ti voglio / mi preoccupo per te /ti amo " . I really hope I have been of help for you.
     

    flirtingwdisaster

    New Member
    USA
    English, USA
    Yes, thank you. I actually wanted to get a tattoo of a heart with "Caro mio, ti voglio bene. Ti amo" around it, and wondered if it was correct and if it sounded redundant. I really like the way it sounds, but wouldn't want the translation to be off.
     

    utente

    Senior Member
    American English
    MAVERIK said:
    It might be too redundant , it depends on the context. It is true that " Ti voglio bene " and " Ti amo" in English is the same , I mean , "I love you". It also might be " Honey , I want you / I care of you /I love you " that is in Italian " Tesoro , Ti voglio / mi preoccupo per te /ti amo " . I really hope I have been of help for you.
    Maverik - un piccola nota: anche americani spesso dice "too redundant" ma quella frase proprio è "redundant". La ridondanza è binaria: cioè, qualcosa è superflua o non è superflua.

    --Steven
     

    primo_cerchio

    Senior Member
    Italian Italy
    Example

    You can say ti amo to a lover or husband wife but you usually don't say it to a friend
    also you love your sons abov everybody and everything but you say ti voglio bene to a son

    ti amo is related to sex and to romance
     

    flirtingwdisaster

    New Member
    USA
    English, USA
    primo_cerchio said:
    Example

    You can say ti amo to a lover or husband wife but you usually don't say it to a friend
    also you love your sons abov everybody and everything but you say ti voglio bene to a son

    ti amo is related to sex and to romance
    That's what I thought, but I was just making sure. I wasn't sure if it sounded right to say them together. But, if "ti voglio bene" has more than one meaning, it should be okay. Right? It would be as if I were saying, "My dear, I care for you/I want you. I love you." I think?
     

    uinni

    Senior Member
    Italy, Italian
    flirtingwdisaster said:
    That's what I thought, but I was just making sure. I wasn't sure if it sounded right to say them together. But, if "ti voglio bene" has more than one meaning, it should be okay. Right? It would be as if I were saying, "My dear, I care for you/I want you. I love you." I think?
    Unfortunately, "ti voglio bene" can lead to misunderstandings too when addressed to a person which is not part of your family. It's basic meaning is "I care of you" but depending on the context and on the expectations of the target, it could be taken as a "ti amo".
    It is up to you to decide how it could turn out to be (mis)understood. When one does not want to be misunderstood in such situations, s/he would use some circumlocution or some additional text that can disentangle the possible misunderstanding...

    Uinni
     

    flirtingwdisaster

    New Member
    USA
    English, USA
    uinni said:
    Unfortunately, "ti voglio bene" can lead to misunderstandings too when addressed to a person which is not part of your family. It's basic meaning is "I care of you" but depending on the context and on the expectations of the target, it could be taken as a "ti amo".
    It is up to you to decide how it could turn out to be (mis)understood. When one does not want to be misunderstood in such situations, s/he would use some circumlocution or some additional text that can disentangle the possible misunderstanding...

    Uinni
    I think in my situation there won't be a problem with misunderstanding. Yes, it will be in ink on my skin and people might not understand, but it's really only for me and my lover to understand ;) Thanks, though!
     

    victoria luz

    Senior Member
    italy
    A little note about the two words in the title:

    It seems you all were so focused on the nuances of ti amo and ti voglio bene that it escaped your attention: Caro mio sounds somewhat ironic (it is used when reprimanding, reproaching, nagging, proving you were right, and this sort of unpleasant occasions...).:eek:

    The natural form to say My dear/Honey/Sweetie/Sweetheart is either simply Caro or Mio caro. I'd go for the former. Or else use another term of endearment.

    Now, FlirtingW, it might be just for you and your hubby to understand, but I don't suppose you want to get something that sounds altogether different, do you? :D
     

    anton_fairfax

    New Member
    Australia - english
    Caro mio sounds somewhat ironic (it is used when reprimanding, reproaching, nagging, proving you were right, and this sort of unpleasant occasions...).:eek:

    The natural form to say My dear/Honey/Sweetie/Sweetheart is either simply Caro or Mio caro. I'd go for the former. Or else use another term of endearment.
    so does this mean the phrase "cara mia" is similarly unpleasant? i thought this was a fairly common term of endearment, so i'd hate to be using it if its incorrect!?!? is it nicer to say Cara or Mia cara?
     

    Lorenzo1980

    Member
    Italy, Italian
    Yes, "cara mia" (as well as "caro mio") generally sounds ironic, though not necessarily unpleasant. It also depends on the context and on the tone. But "mia cara" is nicer.
     

    Annalà

    New Member
    Italian
    The term "caro/a" isn't really used in spoken Italian anymore, if not with the connotations already explained... I wouldn't call the person I love that way (it sounds really odd to me...and I would start laughing if my boyfriend called me so...but maybe that's just preference) and never heard someone actually calling their lover that way (maybe older people... but I'm not sure). More common ways to call the person you love are amore (mio)/ tesoro (mio).
     

    Lorenzo1980

    Member
    Italy, Italian
    True: "caro/a" isn't often used in spoken Italian. It is sometimes used to greet people ("carissimo... quanto tempo! come stai?" i.e.: "My dear... I haven't seen you for so long! How are you?") but sounds a little formal. I would never say something like that to a friend of mine. And I don't think I would call the person I love "cara", unless I wanted to be ironic. Personally, if someone calls me "caro", I think he/she is joking.
     
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