Carolina’s frontier was often aflame

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HolyUnicorn

Senior Member
Mandarin / the Shanghai Dialect
Hello:

“Nearby, in Florida, the Catholic Spaniards abhorred the intrusion of these Protestant heretics. Carolina’s frontier was often aflame. Spanish-incited Indians brandished their tomahawks, and armor-clad warriors of Spain frequently unsheathed their swords during the successive Anglo-Spanish wars.”

From “The American Pageant” by Thomas A. Bailey

Does “aflame” mean “in flames”? Because the English in Carolina and the Spanish in Florida were fighting against each other, Carolina’s frontier was often burning. Am I correct?
 
  • HolyUnicorn

    Senior Member
    Mandarin / the Shanghai Dialect
    It's a variation of number 2, yes.
    Thanks,Barque. I have checked various dictionaries. Firstly, how can a place be aflame (figuratively)? Secondly, what does "temperature was high" in post 2 mean? I would appreciate it if you could give further explanations.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Firstly, how can a place be aflame (figuratively)?
    Words/phrases like "aflame", "burning", "on fire" etc. can be used figuratively to refer to violence and war - things arising out of passion and anger. I referred to "high temperatures" because the temperature at a place that was burning would of course be high.

    Carolina’s frontier was often aflame.
    The frontier was burning = It was a place of violence and fighting and angry, red-hot feeling.

    Edited to correct typo.
     
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