carries a line of sports merchandise

  • nzseries1

    Senior Member
    New Zealand - English
    I would say that badgrammar is correct. A series refers to something with a storyline, or perhaps something that is ongoing.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    As an aside, we say "sporting goods" as mentioned by badgrammar or "sports equipment."

    To me, "sports merchandise" implies items like coffee cups or shirts with the names of favourite teams or similar items. For example, see HERE.

    Disclaimer: This is not to suggest that I purchase any of this sort of stuff or that I suggest that anybody else should do so. In other words, I am NOT advertising.
     

    nzseries1

    Senior Member
    New Zealand - English
    Not really, I would say it means just "some", or "at least one". For it to be "a variety", you would have to say "many lines of".

    From m-w.com (line):
    11 : merchandise or services of the same general class for sale or regularly available
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    In the U.S., "a line of" implies a particular segments of a product by a particular manufacturer, for example, "Nike running shoes" or Adidas hiking shoes.

    The same implication exists for general clothing by a designer or manufacturer. See here.

    If that's not the intent, just leave it out, e.g. "The store carries sporting goods."

    (M-W aside, my comments come from being raised in the retail clothing industry)
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I'd like to note that "carries a full line of" followed by a general category actually means "carries several product lines", as confusing as that may be.

    For example, "The Beauty Shoppe carries a full line of cosmetic products" often means that they carry several lines of products from different manufacturers. I don't know why this phrase is used in such a way, but I've encountered it on a regular basis.
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    I'd like to note that "carries a full line of" followed by a general category actually means "carries several product lines", as confusing as that may be.

    For example, "The Beauty Shoppe carries a full line of cosmetic products" often means that they carry several lines of products from different manufacturers. I don't know why this phrase is used in such a way, but I've encountered it on a regular basis.
    Thanks, JamesM, for the amusing and useful info.
    As a small aside, I notice that you used another musty old word "Shoppe." Do people in your part of world actually use it on a daily basis?
     
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