carro (pronunciation R/RR, Puerto Rico)

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SnowsCold

New Member
USA English
Moderator note: this post and the posts that follow were split from another thread about another topic. -fenixpollo

Hi there...
I believe I might be the first to make this notation which is why I've decided to respond.

I grew up in the Cuban-American community in Miami. It seems as if Cuban accents are quite different from region to region. For example I met a Cuban from an area called "Oriente" and their Spanish was identical to the Spanish spoken in Dominican Republic rather than the Spanish spoken in the other parts of Cuba. I have no idea why but that's how it is.

For example I was surprised to see people in this forum commenting on the lack of "r" pronunciation by Cubans. I find that interesting since the region where my family came from is adamant about correctly pronouncing your "r's". I can still remember being about 4 years old and my mom worrying about my correctly rolling my r's.

I'm not sure if the differences are due to socioeconomic factors, proper education, or whatnot. All I know is that most of the Cubans in Miami will speak using all R's. Dropped letters at the end of of certain words are quite common though...but only with friends/family.

Finally, most people I know find Cuban Spanish and Puerto Rican Spanish to be very different. Mainly because of the "r" use. The Puerto Ricans that I've met drop the "r's" and say "cajo" instead of "carro." For someone like myself (Spanish is my less dominant language) it gets to be quite difficult to understand words without the R's.

I think the accents in most Latin American countries are completely different country to country (and even within those countries). I also believe that individual backgrounds play a role in what type of Spanish you learn. If your family came from Canary Islands as opposed to Andalucia I'm sure even though both are Spanish backgrounds your accents will vary. I recently saw Penelope Cruz in Volver and thought her Spanish very similar to the one I often hear in Miami (with certain differences of course).

Anywho...vive la difference! It makes life so much more interesting...
 
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  • MarX

    Banned
    Indonesian, Indonesia
    Finally, most people I know find Cuban Spanish and Puerto Rican Spanish to be very different. Mainly because of the "r" use. The Puerto Ricans that I've met drop the "r's" and say "cajo" instead of "carro." For someone like myself (Spanish is my less dominant language) it gets to be quite difficult to understand words without the R's.
    I also heard this from Puerto Rican speakers. Their R in Puerto Rico is very similar to the way Germans pronounce their R.
    It is funny because almost all of the people I learned Spanish with have this R, and there are actually native speakers who do the same! LOL!
     

    MarX

    Banned
    Indonesian, Indonesia
    Lo and behold, Venezuelans also speak with those characteristics. I've just heard president Hugo Chavez tell reporters he and King Juan Carlos who told he to shut up at the recent Ibero-American summit in Santiago de Chile that they were "igualeh" instead of "iguales".
    But I think in no other Spanish speaking area do they pronounce RR like Puertoricans do. That is, like a German R.
     

    ismael37

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Hi,

    Some Puerto Ricans change their R´s to L´s at the end of stressed syllables. This is not so in the whole island. Even though it is not a big country, they have their different accents, mainly "from the coast" and "del campo".

    Using a Puerto Rican expression: ¡Hablamo(s) mucha mielda, carajo!

    Saludos a mis panitas boricuas.
     

    hclasalle

    New Member
    Spanish - PR
    A blog about the letter R and Boricua identity The Letter R and Boricua Identity

    On the pronounciation of the letter S -- this is the same as Canary Islands (where most of the Spanish Caribbean's ancestors came from, and their accent is nearly identical to Puerto Rican accent most of the time) and also from Andalucía and the south of Spain in general. My mother is from Quebradillas, a small town in Puerto Rico where people have very distinct accents (it's one of the towns where people change "e" at the end of a word for "I"--as in "lechi di poti" instead of leche de pote), and listening to the very old people from there is very interesting. It's almost like being in Andalucía, there are videos on youtube of Andalucian accent which remind me of the old people from Quebradillas.

    On the pronounciation of the R, one thing that most people forget is that when Haiti became independent (early 1800's) there was a huge genocide of whites in Haiti, and fighting that lasted many decades, and thousands of French people had to leave Haiti and go elsewhere, which is in part how Louisiana got settled, but also affected PR tremendously. In the 1800's, the Spanish crown got paranoid after what happened in Haiti, and passed a law called "La Cédula de Gracias" giving land as incentive to (almost exclusively white) CATHOLICS to settle Puerto Rico--because they figured that they would be more loyal to the Spanish crown. Thousands went to PR from Catholic lands, which explains why there are many Irish last names on the island, but most especially the French who were fleeing Haiti came to the island. Many people have French last names, which sometimes are spelled according to Spanish convention and have evolved (Peugeot became Pellot). Also, I suspect the tradition of "pan sobao" (which is the Puerto Rican version of the French baguette) comes from this great migration. But the most striking evidence of French migration is the way the letter R is pronounced throughout the island. I'm not sure that this comes from Africa, although it may have, but many families that seem to have little to no African heritage pronounce the double R like the French.

    Another possibility that some linguists have proposed is that this is a natural evolution of Romance languages, and they cite Brasilian Portuguese, which also does the same thing with its R.
     
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