carry them through

aiyu

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi! This is from Hamlet (RSC Shakespeare).
Hamlet is speaking ill about Osric. I'm posting this thread again to know the correct meaning of 'carry through' in this context.


He did comply with his dug before he sucked it. Thus has he—and many more of the same bevy that I know the drossy age dotes on—only got the tune of the time and outward habit of encounter, a kind of yeasty collection, which carries them through and through the most fond and winnowed opinions; and do but blow them to their trial, the bubbles are out.

The underlined sentences are not clear to me. I'd like to know if my understanding below is correct:
'which enables them to succeed in defeating wise people's opinions(fond and winnowed opinion), but once they are questioned, the bubbles are burst.'

Thanks for your help.

 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I think your interpretation looks good except for "wise people's opinions", aiyu. As I read it, "fond and winnowed opinions" means "foolish opinions and well-considered, rational opinions." I base that interpretation on one definition for "winnow"* that means something like "to analyze critically" or "to sift".

    *Linked to Online Etymology Dictionary: "winnow"
     

    aiyu

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Many thanks, owlman5. I thought the two words of 'fond' and 'winnowed' should have similar meaning. But actually they are not.
     
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