carrying the weft thread across between the warp threads

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  • Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I agree with PaulQ.

    Here's another example for comparison.

    The workman needed to carry the container across the car park. There were cars in his way. He carried the container across between the cars. This means he carried the container across the car park, between the cars.

    I hope that example gives you another way to understand the original part in bold.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Afterthought

    I think that the oxforddictionaries quote would have been clearer with an added comma.

    "...a bobbin with two pointed ends used for carrying the weft thread across, between the warp threads in weaving..."
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Afterthought

    I think that the oxforddictionaries quote would have been clearer with an added comma.

    "...a bobbin with two pointed ends used for carrying the weft thread across, between the warp threads in weaving..."
    And the "across" still remains a preposition (doesn't become an adverb), right?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Afterthought

    I think that the oxforddictionaries quote would have been clearer with an added comma.

    "...a bobbin with two pointed ends used for carrying the weft thread across, between the warp threads in weaving..."
    If would be even clearer if it was an accurate definition. A shuttle isn't a bobbin, it's a bobbin carrier. The bobbin in PaulQ's picture link is the part in the middle that carries the thread. As the OED correctly points out
    a. An instrument used in weaving for passing the thread of the weft to and fro from one edge of the cloth to the other between the threads of the warp. fly shuttle (see fly n.2 Compounds 2).

    The normal form of the shuttle resembles that of a boat, whence its name in various langs. (Latin navicula, French navette, German weberschiff). Along the middle is an axis or ‘spindle’, on which revolves the ‘quill’ or ‘bobbin’, a cylinder carrying the thread of the weft.
     
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