carton / pot / container of yoghurt [yogurt]

kuleshov

Senior Member
Spain Spanish
Do you use both names interchangeably when referring to the typical container? Or, are there any differences? Can a CARTON/POT be made of any material? Plastic, glass, etc.

Cheers
 
  • domangelo

    Senior Member
    United States English
    I would call a yogurt container a tub in English. I would call it a pot only if I were speaking French.
     
    I have a feeling that, as far as dairy containers go, pot is (approximately) round while carton is square...yoghurt pots are usually either plastic or tetrapack cardboard (ie covered with metal foil & plastic inside). But they are still pots. If I heard a carton of yoghurt it would suggest an unusual, probably square and quite likely large (ie milk-carton-looking) container.

    Carton is cardboard, at least partially, and it's the word used for milk containers which are not bottles (bottles are nowadays usually plastic, but can be glass).

    Generally:
    pot of yoghurt
    carton/bottle of milk
    carton of juice
    tub of margarine
    bar of butter
    tub of ice cream (but box is also possible)
    tube of tomato pure
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I agree with Magda's list, except that I don't think I could say "box" of icecream ("tub" is fine); and for me it's a "packet" of butter, not a "bar".
     

    kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    Shall we say a pot of yoghurt in the UK and a tub of yoghurt in the USA? meaning the same container?
     

    domangelo

    Senior Member
    United States English
    Shall we say a pot of yoghurt in the UK and a tub of yoghurt in the USA? meaning the same container?
    This is my impression. I don't think that we ever use "pot" for such small containers in AE (though others may disagree.) Thus, a tub of yogurt (the more common spelling in AE) and a jar of jam.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Yogurt (without the silly "h") is sold in "cups" in the USA.

    Even the Dannon website calls them "cups", and that would be the tapered cylindrical plastic containers with a removable lid.

    I would always call them "containers" myself.

    I think I will have a container of strawberry yogurt.

    I think I will have a cup of strawberry yogurt.

    (From now on I will call them cups; fewer keystrokes--and I speak in keystrokes nowadays).
     

    KHS

    Senior Member
    Shall we say a pot of yoghurt in the UK and a tub of yoghurt in the USA? meaning the same container?
    What others are calling a "pot" of yoghurt I would call a "container" of yoghurt in my variety of AE. And a stick of butter (or a pound, or a 'pat' when it's the single serving size found in restaurants). Also a "container" of ice cream.

    And we have very few tubes of things in the US - maybe anchovy paste or toothpaste - although my life as a cook is pretty much limited to nuking vegetables in the microwave, so there may have been changes that I'm not aware of.

    Sometimes we get milk or juice in one-gallon plastic jugs (they have a handle on one side).
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    It seems clear, kuleshov, that you're going to have to decide which variety of English you want!:)
     

    kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    I like them all. I find it fascinating, actually. Just a simple container and so many different words to refer to it. I don't have a lot of free time, but if I did, I would even start researching the etymology. One of my favourite documentary series is The Adventure of English!!!

    Thank you world!!!
     

    KHS

    Senior Member
    Actually, I have been seriously considering adopting "pottle."

    However, the Merriam Webster online dictionary says:
    ----------
    Main Entry: pot·tle
    Function: noun
    Etymology: Middle English potel, from Anglo-French, from pot
    Date: 14th century
    : a container holding a half gallon (1.9 liters)
    ----------------

    In New Zealand, does it continue to have the half gallon (1.9 litre) sense?
     

    cycloneviv

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    I started reading this thread thinking that in AusE I definitely say "a tub of yoghurt", but by the time I got to the end I'd become hopelessly confused. I think that's what I'd say, but usually I avoid the issue:

    Can you grab me the yoghurt out of the fridge?
    I got some vanilla yoghurt from the supermarket the other day. It's really nice!
     

    kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    When I visit : http://www.thefoodhall.es/ for example, I don't know where to find yogurt. I thought I'd find it in "desserts."

    Which category do you usually hit when you go shopping for yogurt online?

    Why the way, in Spain, even though we have a word referring to a yogurt container, nobody uses it; we simply say a yogurt, 2 yogurts... What about in your countries?

    Cheers ;)
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    Why the way, in Spain, even though we have a word referring to a yogurt container, nobody uses it; we simply say a yogurt, 2 yogurts... What about in your countries?
    Same here. We never use any name of container in French: I'll have a yogurt.
    It seems we only ever use "a pot of yogurt" as an image to describe a very small car (the Austin Mini Cooper type).
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Well, I can't say I never use the word for the container...

    This morning I had a yoghurt for breakfast. Then I put the pot in the bin.
     

    cycloneviv

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    After some hour's cogitation, I've changed my mind. If I mentioned the box-thing it was in, I would most likely say "a container of yoghurt".

    For example, I'd say:

    Did you rinse out the yoghurt container before you put it in the recycling?

    I grabbed a container of Greek yoghurt on the way home and made a delicious smoothy for lunch.
     

    out2lnch

    Senior Member
    English-Canada
    I've never heard 'pot' used, and would refer to it as a container as well. This would mostly be once it was empty, and looking to be recycled. Otherwise, either it is not called anything: "pass me a yogurt", or the ill-defined 'thing': "I had a thing of yogurt".

    We also use 'cup' to refer to the little ones.
     

    chenqiyouxian

    Member
    Chinese-China
    <This discussion has been added to a previous thread. Cagey, moderator>

    Hi everyone,how do I say that(in picture1) in English? A pack of yogurt? a carton of yogurt(in picture2)?
     

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    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    A multi-pack of yogurt. (Usually spelled without the 'h' in American English.)
    A carton of yogurt. or just A yogurt.
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    As is often the case, it depends on where you are speaking English. :) In AmerEng, the single serving is a carton or a container or, as Myridon noted, simply "a yogurt." It would not be called a tub or pot, which seem to be BritEng usages.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    In some online sites, (1) is simply referred to as a 6x125g red fruit variety pack.

    Informally, we would call (2) a big pot of <specification of yogurt variety>.

    (No h in yogurt, most of the time, here.)
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    As is often the case, it depends on where you are speaking English. :) In AmerEng, the single serving is a carton or a container or, as Myridon noted, simply "a yogurt." It would not be called a tub or pot, which seem to be BritEng usages.
    I don't think I've ever used carton for the small container. "A yogurt" or "a cup of yogurt" or "a container of yogurt" are all fine with me.
     
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