carve or cut a chicken/turkey?

jokaec

Senior Member
Chinese - Hong Kong
Could you help me "carve" or "cut" this chicken breast into pieces?

Are they both correct? If so, which is the difference? If not, why did I see "carved chicken breast" products? Thank you!
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    'Carve' is what you do when the whole cooked bird is on the table, and you're cutting pieces off to put on people's plates. 'Cut' is more general. You might cut chicken up into small pieces to put into a frying pan.

    cross-posted and agreed
     

    dermott

    Senior Member
    B.E. via Australian English
    You could probably say either, though cut is probably more appropriate for a chicken breast. Or slice. Carve is more applicable to slicing a whole bird. Carved chicken breast on packaging refers to having been carved from a whole bird.
     

    Drim

    New Member
    English-US
    I think it would depend very much on whether the breast you're speaking about has a bone, or is boneless.

    While Merriam-Webster does have the following definition of carve:
    1. 3 : to cut into pieces or slices <carved the turkey>
    The word 'carve' is generally only used when cutting into something larger, like a whole turkey or a block of wood. So if the chicken breast had a bone, you might be carving into it.

    On the other hand, if you were speaking about a single boneless breast of chicken and wished to cut it entirely into pieces, you would not be carving it, but more likely slicing, cutting, or cubing.
     

    csicska

    Senior Member
    hungarian
    This new discussion has been added to a previous thread. Cagey, moderator

    Hello. Could you please tell me if we "carve" or "cut" a chicken once it is cooked? Thank you.

    My wife took the casserole from the oven and started to carve/cut the chicken.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    You carve a roast. This has been the way it has been said since at least Chaucer's time. So yeah, you carve the chicken, turkey, beef, lamb, or venison roast . But you might cut the roast into pieces before it's cooked. Carving is sort of that special moment when the roast is just ready to eat. Now for Americans, casseroles are sort of the antithesis of a roast, so you would cut or slice it, or dish it out. They usually involve moisture and some form of starch, so the meat is intended to be soft.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    You carve a roast. This has been the way it has been said since at least Chaucer's time. So yeah, you carve the chicken, turkey, beef, lamb, or venison roast . But you might cut the roast into pieces before it's cooked. Carving is sort of that special moment when the roast is just ready to eat. Now for Americans, casseroles are sort of the antithesis of a roast, so you would cut or slice it, or dish it out. They usually involve moisture and some form of starch, so the meat is intended to be soft.
    :thumbsup:
    Carving also usually involves creating slices where possible, while cut is far more vague.
     
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