cascading upward through a chain of turbulent features...

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qizi

Senior Member
Chinese
Beyond two or three days, the world’s best weather forecasts are speculative, and beyond six or seven they are worthless.
The Butterfly Effect is the reason. For small pieces of weather—and to a global forecaster, small can mean thunderstorms and blizzards – any prediction deteriorates rapidly. Errors and uncertainties multiply, cascading upward through a chain of turbulent features, from dust devils and squalls up to continent-size eddies that only satellites can see.

Here is my exercise materials of translation study, but I didn't get the meaning of the blue part. Could you rewrite or explain it in plain English for me? Thank you.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    cascade (noun) = waterfall.
    cascade (verb) = fall fast like a waterfall - often with sense "faster and faster" or "more and more" - and almost always metaphorical, so things can cascade sideways or upwards, though real waterfalls don't.

    The turbulent features are turbulent winds such as squalls, and other 'features' created by winds, such as dust devils. These link into (form a complicated part of) bigger and bigger wind/weather features. A 'chain' can be any connection of one thing to another to another, so the wind features are chained from small structures that would blow you around to big structures that affect your whole town, to huge structures like cyclones covering much of the South China Sea or the Caribbean.

    So the uncertainties in how to calculate weather become bigger and bigger as you move 'up' the chain from small winds to increasingly bigger wind structures. The 'up(ward)' means "along the chain", not literally higher up in the atmosphere. Has this been useful?
     

    Saurabh

    Senior Member
    English-British, Hindi
    Entangled bank has given explanations as sought.
    I would just like to tell you meaning of these two sentences highlighted in bold:
    Cascading effect means a chain of series which is enduring i.e. one after other and so on.
    Turbulent means which is not fixed and keeps on changing.
     

    qizi

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    cascade (noun) = waterfall.
    cascade (verb) = fall fast like a waterfall - often with sense "faster and faster" or "more and more" - and almost always metaphorical, so things can cascade sideways or upwards, though real waterfalls don't.

    The turbulent features are turbulent winds such as squalls, and other 'features' created by winds, such as dust devils. These link into (form a complicated part of) bigger and bigger wind/weather features. A 'chain' can be any connection of one thing to another to another, so the wind features are chained from small structures that would blow you around to big structures that affect your whole town, to huge structures like cyclones covering much of the South China Sea or the Caribbean.

    So the uncertainties in how to calculate weather become bigger and bigger as you move 'up' the chain from small winds to increasingly bigger wind structures. The 'up(ward)' means "along the chain", not literally higher up in the atmosphere. Has this been useful?
    Thank you very much for such a comprehensive explanation. It really is a big help for me.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Since I have never seen a waterfall ascending towards the heavens, I intensely dislike "cascading upwards." (A pedantic side note)
     
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