Case study

  • dwipper

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    That really depends on your definition of case. English doesn't really have cases sense that languages like Latin, Greek, Russian, etc. do. However, we do have remnants in our pronouns, with nominative (subjects) and accusative (objects). Most of our cases are expressed analytically through syntax, using prepositions, placement, etc. Through these means we can probably express a couple dozen 'cases,' depending on what you consider a case.
     

    Txiri

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Descriptives of other languages might indeed describe English grammar according to cases.

    But we don´t, in English. I often heard Spanish students talk about the English genitive ( the apostrophe ´s , to discuss the possessive.)

    In English, we don´t discuss our own grammar this way.

    What exactly are you talking about when you say "case study"?

    It sounds more pertinent to scientific control studies.
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Txiri-
    Whether titan2 is speaking about English grammar or scientific studies in which a psychologist offers case studies in their dissertation that support their thesis, we don't know....
    ....As far as learning English grammar, I think a lot of US English-speaking people will agree that it wasn't until learning another language that they started using words to analyze their own language--including nominative case, objective case, etc....
    ....I guess we'll have to wait to see what exactly titan2 meant by entitling his thread Case Study and asking how many cases there were in English.
     

    Txiri

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Fine by me.

    Presenting questions in an unambiguous way would be a deligth
     
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