Cast = give off light

Super Saiyan

Senior Member
Cantonese
Hi, everyone

I’m wondering if this sentence is natural. You’re describing the bus traveling out on a sunny day and on a day that the sky is dim on a different page. The bus driving out on the sunny day has more sunlight shining on it (the yellow color is sharp, the same bus driving out on a not so bright day seems darker (the color of the bus is darker), so you say the below:

“The color of this bus looks different than the same bus on the other page because the sun is not casting enough light on it. The bus looks dark.”

Thanks
 
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  • Super Saiyan

    Senior Member
    Cantonese
    Thanks. I am trying to describe a bus going down hill where there are shadows casting on the bus. By looking at the same bus, the color of the bus darkened.

    What is the best way to say this?
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Objects cast shadows as well.

    Replacing "enough" with "the same" in your original sentence would be fine. Alternatively you could say it is because shadows are being cast on it (passive voice, since you are not saying what it is that casts the shadows).
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Your title is "Cast = give off light" but "to cast" = to throw
    All other meanings of "to cast" are either figurative or extended:
    In reference to light and shade, to cast = (i) To throw or (ii) cause (light, darkness etc.) to be thrown on or over any object.
    To cast light/darkness/shade, etc, is relatively high register - it is not a particularly common word that appears in everyday conversation.
     

    Super Saiyan

    Senior Member
    Cantonese
    Objects cast shadows as well.

    Replacing "enough" with "the same" in your original sentence would be fine. Alternatively you could say it is because shadows are being cast on it (passive voice, since you are not saying what it is that casts the shadows).
    Thanks Uncle Jack

    Your title is "Cast = give off light" but "to cast" = to throw
    All other meanings of "to cast" are either figurative or extended:
    In reference to light and shade, to cast = (i) To throw or (ii) cause (light, darkness etc.) to be thrown on or over any object.
    To cast light/darkness/shade, etc, is relatively high register - it is not a particularly common word that appears in everyday conversation.
    Thanks, PaulQ

    It might seem a silly question, “The tree cast a long shadow on the lawn.” The sentence is copied from a dictionary, does the subject needs to be a light source in order to cast a shadow? Like the light from a computer cast a shadow on the kid’s face.

    A tree is not a light source, how can it cast a long shadow?

    Can you please help? Thanks
     
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    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    The sentence is correct. The sun, moon, candles, electric lights and a raging inferno can cast light. Trees, and other objects that block the light, cast shadows.
     
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    Super Saiyan

    Senior Member
    Cantonese
    Thank you, Uncle Jack. I now know how to use the word cast in English better and thanks Paul for the great correction. Cool!
     

    Super Saiyan

    Senior Member
    Cantonese
    Hi, PaulQ, I just revisited this thread and read what you wrote. I was wondering this. The bus is going down and it’s driving. ‘There are shadows being cast on it by the buildings that it passes’, should it be ‘it is passing’ instead of ‘it passes’ because the bus is passing the buildings. This is only my logic. if it is ok to use, what is the difference in meaning? If it is not ok to use, what is the reason? Thanks
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    ‘There are shadows being cast on it by the buildings that it passes’, should it be ‘it is passing’ instead of ‘it passes’ because the bus is passing the buildings.
    This is a question about the use of the simple and the continuous form of the verb - it is a new question: you should create a new post. :thumbsup:
     
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