castellano/español

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by OHSU, Dec 29, 2009.

  1. OHSU Senior Member

    Tucson, Arizona
    English - American
    NOTE: I have read over many of the castellano vs. español threads, and my question is different from the ones I've read, hopefully less superficial. I'm not asking which one is "correct", or "accepted" by the academy, or enshrined in someone's constitution. I'm also not asking for a history lesson, because I'm already very familiar with the historical evolution of the Romance languages and the historical languages/dialects of Spain.

    Nevertheless, I'm unfamiliar with the political and linguistic attitudes of certain parts of the Spanish-speaking world, particularly Spain. I'd love input from any of our native Spanish speakers, Latin American and Spanish, on the use of the terms castellano and español.

    -- When referring to the Spanish language, do you prefer to say castellano or español?
    -- What connotation does each of those words have for you?
    -- What judgments do you make about someone when you hear them say one vs. the other?
    -- Do you ever experience confusion about what someone meant because they used one vs. the other?
    -- Any other personal insight beyond the superficial meaning of the words or their relative "correctness"?
    -- (MOD EDIT: This is the English-Spanish forum, discussion of usages in other languages is out of the scope of this forum)

    I ask because there are several hundred million of you living in dozens of countries, and I know that these terms resonate differently depending on your political, regional, educational, and (possibly) ethnic background. I don't pose these questions out of idle curiosity. I want to improve my understanding of your cultures beyond the superficial issue of what the terms mean and which one somebody thinks is "correct".
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2009
  2. Cazuela Senior Member

    Chile
    Español
    Today we had this same discussion at work. In Chile we used to use "castellano", for example, the name of my languague class was "Castellano". Now we are trying to migrate to "español". The reason, as someone explained to me a while ago, is that the "español" is more wider and includes words and terms from Latin America and even some "anglicanismos". The "Real Academia de la Lengua ... Española" and not "castellana", is a good reference.

    Hope it helps.
     
  3. OHSU Senior Member

    Tucson, Arizona
    English - American
    That is very helpful regarding attitudes in Chile. Thank you!
     
  4. elmg

    elmg Senior Member

    Santiago - Chile
    Spanish - Argentina
    Hola

    En Argentina la clase de lengua se llama meramente "Lengua" sin especificar castellano o español. De cualquier forma, se suele utilizar la palabra castellano para referirse al idioma.

    Mis disculpas por responder en castellano, leo ingles mucho mejor de lo que escribo, esto ultimo me lleva demasiado tiempo.

    Saludos.
     
  5. PACOALADROQUE Senior Member

    El Puerto de Santa María (CÁDIZ-ESPAÑA)
    ESPAÑOL (CARTAGENA-ESPAÑA)
    Te pongo lo que dice el DRAE y la Constitución española de 1979:

    Del DRAE:
    español, la.
    Lengua común de España y de muchas naciones de América, hablada también como propia en otras partes del mundo.
    castellano, na.
    Lengua española, especialmente cuando se quiere introducir una distinción respecto a otras lenguas habladas también como propias en España.
    De la Constitución:
    Artículo 3.
    1. El castellano es la lengua española oficial del Estado. Todos los españoles tienen el deber de conocerla y el derecho a usarla.

    A partir de aquí puede haber una gran discusión. Yo suelo decir, indistintammente, que hablo español/castellano.

    En España, si alguien me habla en su lengua materna (gallego, catalán, euskera, etc.) lo más probable es que le diga "háblame en castellano". Si me habla un extranjero le diría yo sólo hablo español.
    Saludos.
     
  6. Cazuela Senior Member

    Chile
    Español
    Interesante la explicación de Paco, creo que queda clarísimo. También me parece que universalmente se usa más el término "español" en formularios o alternativas de idioma en los sitios WEB.
     
  7. Ushuaia

    Ushuaia Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    castellano rioplatense
    After a couple of years in this forum, I've come to terms with the use of "español", which in Argentina does sound like it's been translated from English: we are taught in school that "castellano" is the name of our language and --just like those who have been taught that the proper name is "español"-- we like it like that.

    I can't help expecting the same people who call our language "español" to say "asumir" when they mean "dar por sentado" or "americano" when they mean "estadounidense": it may be prejudiced, but in Argentina it's also a safe bet!
     
  8. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    What's interesting to me is that "castellano" is so widely used in Argentina, where the other languages of Spain are not really spoken.
    Americano = estadounidense.
     
  9. OHSU Senior Member

    Tucson, Arizona
    English - American
    Gracias por la aportación.

    No se preocupe. Cada quien en la lengua que le convenga. Por eso mismo casi siempre escribo en inglés -- no porque no sepa español, sino porque el inglés lo encuentro más fácil.

    VERY interesting. Thank you very much for contributing.

    This is also a very, very interesting insight. I knew castellano was more common in Argentina, but I didn't realize you felt this way about it.

    I have found this article that goes into quite some detail on the matter:

    http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pol%C3%A9mica_en_torno_a_espa%C3%B1ol_o_castellano
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2009
  10. ORL Senior Member

    Spanish/Argentina
    Please, not again. There are thousands of threads about this already.

    Well, that´s not quite true. The school subject has been successively called "castellano", "lenguaje", "lengua castellana", "lengua y literatura", "lengua y literatura castellana" and more recently, simply "lengua". In the same way, some time ago we had "educación cívica", which was then called "ERSA" (Estudio de la Realidad Social Argentina, an euphemism used by the dictatorship), then "ciencias sociales", merely "sociales" after that and who knows how now.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2009
  11. En México prácticamente no decimos castellano. No se usa en los doblajes latinoamericanos. Sabemos que es el español de Castilla que viajó como lengua de la conquista, pero llamar a nuestra lengua así está en desuso.
     
  12. ampurdan

    ampurdan Senior Member

    jiā tàiluó ní yà
    Català & español (Spain)
    MODERATION NOTE:

    This is the Spanish-English forum. Please, do not discuss word usages in other languages.

    The difference between languages and dialects is not the question of this thread.

    The synonym condition of "castellano" and "español" has been discussed elsewhere in these forums; the correctness of these terms is not the question of this thread.

    Please, confine yourselves to discussing the connotations Spanish speakers of different lands give to these words. Do not make an issue of the "correctness" of any particular connotation.

    Thank you for your attention.
     
  13. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile
    That is because it used be "Real Academia Española de la Lengua Castellana"

    It changed not too long ago "
    Real Academia Española" along with Castellano being now one of the four official languages in Spain.

    Same thing happened with the whole world. We do not have 5 continents anymore. :)
     
  14. Ynez Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish
    My books and subjects were always called "Lengua Española", but when talking to friends we just say "Lengua".

    In my region, which is a monolingual Spanish region, the common and normal is "español", but I am sure some people will say "castellano", even though our region is not any of the two Castillas existing nowadays.
     
  15. Dragowoman

    Dragowoman Member

    Costa Blanca - Spain
    Spanish - Spain
    Hi,

    From my very personal point of view, I think the only conclusion one can reach is that there is no definitive answer to that question. It always depends on different factors, altough your proposal to collect different personal points of view is very interesting.

    I pretty much agree with Paco when he says:

    En España, si alguien me habla en su lengua materna (gallego, catalán, euskera, etc.) lo más probable es que le diga "háblame en castellano". Si me habla un extranjero le diría yo sólo hablo español.

    I use both terms frequently, and choose one of them depending on the specific context and scope of the conversation, on the people I address my speech to, and probably on my intentions, too.

    Saludos
     
  16. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile
    Y por lo que dice, yo hablo Castellano, no sé gallego, catalán ni euskera, que me imagino son las otras leguas oficiales de España, y soy de Chile.

    No veo por qué debo decir que hablo español. Aunque si hay que cambiar por dictamen, habrá que acatar. :)
     
  17. mundosnuevos Senior Member

    Estados Unidos
    Inglés - EEUU
    Una pregunta para los argentinos/chilenos: ¿en qué contexto sí usarían la palabra 'español'? ¿Sólo para referirse a algo/alguien procediente de España?
     
  18. Mephistofeles

    Mephistofeles Senior Member

    Mexico
    Mexican Spanish
    Personalmente, siempre he tenido la sensación de que castellano es la versión original, y más pura si se desea verlo así, del español, que surgió precisamente, a partir del castellano. Esa es la connotación que tengo.
     
  19. elmg

    elmg Senior Member

    Santiago - Chile
    Spanish - Argentina
    Hola

    Como se ha desarrollado en toda la discusión de este hilo es super ambigua la utilización de los terminos. Español se refiere a lo procedente de España, como bien decís, pero también hace referencia al idioma castellano con el acento o el tono propio de España que es distinto del que se habla en América Latina.
    Creo que está en el sentido común de muchos argentinos que definir nuestro idioma como "idioma español" referencia una cierta dependencia con respecto a España y que por el contrario decir "idioma castellano" no plantearía este inconveniente. Por supuesto no se reflexiona en que castellano proviene de Castilla. Probablemente esto sea una percepción muy subjetiva mía, pero si no me equivoco es a lo que apunta la pregunta.
     
  20. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile
    Correcto. Pero como alguien ya mencionó, en Chile se está cambiando a decir que hablamos Español. ¿A título de que?

    ¿Me imagino porque en España ahora hay cuatro lenguas oficiales y dicen genéricamente Español para no herir susceptibilidades?

    Lo que es yo, sigo hablando castellano. :) (mal hablado, pero castellano al fin y al cabo)
     
  21. ampurdan

    ampurdan Senior Member

    jiā tàiluó ní yà
    Català & español (Spain)
    En España oficialmente se habla tanto de español como de castellano. Los libros de texto dicen lengua española o lengua castellana. Esa es mi percepción.

    Aquí en Cataluña, en lengua castellana, suele hablarse mucho más de "castellano" que de "español"; aunque cuando alguna gente habla de la lengua castellana como algo ajeno o impuesto (¡ojo! no estoy posicionándome a favor ni en contra de esta postura o del razonamiento que hace esta gente, ni es este el lugar para hacerlo, simplemente constato su existencia), suele llamarla "español".
     
  22. OHSU Senior Member

    Tucson, Arizona
    English - American
    Gracias por estas fascinantes observaciones.
     
  23. Södertjej

    Södertjej Senior Member

    Junto al Mediterráneo
    Spanish ES/Swedish (utlandssvensk)
    Es cierto que el uso extensivo del castellano en lugar de español fue algo que tuvo un boom a partir de la muerte de Franco y la equiparación legal de las otras lenguas.

    Pero con el tiempo es cierto que los sectores independentistas han pasado a usar español para marcar una mayor diferencia con la lengua propia y esa diferenciación no se queda en el idioma. Lo mismo pasa con el término España, tras años de huir de la palabra como de la peste y recurrir a "Estado español" y similares, ahora se oye cada vez más en boca de esos mismos sectores, que también en los últimos años usan con profusión el término "españolista" con las mismas connotaciones políticas.

    No entiendo esa matización que se ha comentado en el sentido de que español es lo que se habla en España y castellano el idioma hablado en todos lados. El castellano también puede entenderser como el español hablado en Castilla, por oposición al hablado en Aragón o en Extremadura, por ejemplo. Es decir, por evitar la identificación con un país se usa un término que se identifica con una región de ese país. No veo que se obtenga ningún distanciamiento con el país que "exportó" el idioma.
     
  24. oligyp Senior Member

    Growing up in a Latin American country, I don't remember using the word "español" as much as is used here in the States. La clase donde te enseñan sobre este idioma y como se escribe, se conjuga y se habla (como ya han dicho muchos aquí), se conoce como "castellano" y debo admitir que yo también tuve un poco de problema ajustándome a usar "español" y no "casttellano" al llegar a este país.
     
  25. Adolfo Afogutu

    Adolfo Afogutu Senior Member

    Uruguay
    Español
    Saludos
     
  26. OHSU Senior Member

    Tucson, Arizona
    English - American
    This seems counterintuitive to me. I would have guessed that they'd use castellano when contrasting with their own language.

    I'm not sure I understand this, either. Is this because of decreasing antagonism between the various regions of Spain and a greater sense of Spanish unity?
     
  27. ampurdan

    ampurdan Senior Member

    jiā tàiluó ní yà
    Català & español (Spain)
    MODERATION NOTE:

    Please, stay on topic. "España" and "Estado español" are not the question of this thread.
     
  28. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile
    Que yo recuerde y sepa, quizás estoy equivocado, en todas partes se usaba decir el castellano, incluso recuerdo en películas españolas decir castellano y no español. Y estoy hablando de mucho antes de la muerte de franco. :)

    Primero: Si yo dijera que hablo chileno, para usted estaría bien, entonces.

    Segundo: El idioma proviene de Castilla, que sucede que está en España. No proviene de la Vascongada, que también sucede estar en España.

    A mí me pasó lo mismo.

    ¿Siempre ha sido así en el Uruguay?

    Mi ramo siempre fué Castellano y no Español, cuando iba al colegio. No sé como será la cosa hoy en día en Chile.
     
  29. Adolfo Afogutu

    Adolfo Afogutu Senior Member

    Uruguay
    Español
    Bueno, entré a fijarme cómo se llama ahora y la materia se sigue llamando igual, con lo que puedo decir que por lo menos durante los últimos treinta años ha sido así.
    Saludos
     
  30. bx2 Senior Member

    Barcelona, Spain
    Catalan and Spanish
    En cuanto a lo primero: depende. La palabra "español" identifica la lengua con todo el territorio de España. Por este motivo, para una persona de nacionalidad española que tenga como lengua materna y "propia" otra que no sea castellano (pongamos gallego, por ejemplo), el término "español" puede parecerle "demasiado incluyente" o "demasiado excluyente." Para entenderlo fácilmente, aquél que quiera sentirse "incluido", probablemente te responderá: "yo soy español, y sin embargo mi lengua materna es el gallego", y preferirá referirse al castellano como castellano, para remarcar que él también es español. En cambio, aquellos que no se sienten españoles, la llaman "español" para remarcar que la consideran una lengua "extranjera."

    En cuanto a tu segunda pregunta, creo que queda fuera del propósito de este hilo, por loq ue refiero no responder, no vaya a ser que los moderadores eliminen mi aportación:eek:
     
  31. bx2 Senior Member

    Barcelona, Spain
    Catalan and Spanish

    Personalmente no, pero hace algunos años, una amiga entró en una librería de Mexico DF en la cual, por algún motivo, parecía haber libros únicamente en inglés. Mi amiga se dirigió a un empleado con la siguiente pregunta:

    - ¿Tienen libros en castellano?

    Respuesta del empleado:

    - No señora, aquí sólo en inglés y en español.:D

    (Los libros en castellano/español estaban en otra planta del edificio)
     
  32. signatus

    signatus New Member

    Spanish - Spain
    Como andaluz, yo prefiero decir que hablo español (con uno de los acentos andaluces). Para mí, castellano es la variedad de español que se habla en Castilla. Es decir, para mí español es el término más general para referirse a un idioma universal y con multitud de variedades. Castellano es el término más específico para la variedad del español de la meseta.
    Sé que hay interpretaciones políticas (sobre todo en España) que prefieren llamar al idioma 'castellano' puesto que entienden que el catalán, el vasco o el gallego son también idiomas españoles (=de España).
    Para 'chileno'. En España sólo hay una lengua oficial. En algunas regiones son co-oficiales, además, otros idiomas (catalán, vasco, gallego, etc.)
     
  33. ampurdan

    ampurdan Senior Member

    jiā tàiluó ní yà
    Català & español (Spain)
    Entiendo perfectamente el punto de vista que pueda tener un andaluz, pero en mi opinión, tan política o apolítica es una interpretación que quiera llamarle "español" porque es el idioma de España como "castellano" para diferenciarse de otras lenguas que se hablan en ese país.

    Por lo demás, ese uso aquí tiene una antigüedad y una vitalidad de siglos, concretamente en castellano, tantos como la introducción del mismo idioma en estas tierras, y va ligado a la expresión del día a día de la gente común, no necesariamente con pretensiones políticas especiales e incluso de sentires políticos diametralmente opuestos.
     
  34. OHSU Senior Member

    Tucson, Arizona
    English - American
    Muchísimas gracias por aclararme esto. ¡Qué interesante!

    ¡Ja, ja! Eso es precisamente lo que quería saber, si sucedía ese tipo de cosa.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2009
  35. Södertjej

    Södertjej Senior Member

    Junto al Mediterráneo
    Spanish ES/Swedish (utlandssvensk)
    No, it's just the opposite, just to remark Spain is not something they're part of. I simply wanted to state there's a political usage of the word español here and now, and it's been clearly explained by Signatus. Of course I don't mean it's something like that 100 years ago.

    No sé qué quieres decir con todas partes, yo hablo de España, no de Chile y aquí, por lo que sé por mi familia, que yo no lo viví, en tiempos de Franco también se decía español.

    No he dicho eso ni sé en qué te basas para llegar a esa conclusión. En todo caso no hablamos de eso en este hilo.


    Sí, de toda la vida. Tampoco entiendo el objeto de este comentario.

    En español o castellano tanto idiomas como nacionalidades se escriben en minúscula.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2009
  36. Idiomático Senior Member

    Virginia, USA
    Latin American Spanish
    I say: aquí se habla español; la literatura española; el diccionario de español; un curso de español; entiendo el español, pero no el catalán ni el gallego. When I hear someone saying "hablo castellano" he or she usually has a Southern Cone accent.
     
  37. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile
    Primero que nada me gustaría aclarar que el tema es fascinante para mí.

    No es mi intención ofender a nadie.

    Me gustaría saber, de todas las personas que dicen que el idioma se llama español, ¿fué siempre así?

    Pregunto porque tengo en mi memoria el haber visto texto de estudio, el cual se referia a la Real Academia Española de la Lengua Castellana.

    Claro, eso fué en Chile y no recuerdo si el texto era hecho en Chile o en otro país, aunque me parece recordar las letras FTD en un logo que venía en la parte de atrás de este texto. Digo me parece, porque tampoco me acuerdo si era en este texto en que este logo aparecía.
     
  38. Idiomático Senior Member

    Virginia, USA
    Latin American Spanish
    Yo tengo 80 años. Para mí siempre fue español. Castellano siempre ha sido un sinónimo poco usado (en primaria, secundaria, superior y especialización en traducción).
     
  39. OHSU Senior Member

    Tucson, Arizona
    English - American
    Of course not. Subsequent to the dissolution of Visigoth Hispania, and previous to the unification of the Christian kingdoms there was no Spain, and hence there was no Spanish language. By the time Castile rose to power, the historical languages of the peninsula were well established entities.

    The first published grammar of any Romance language (written to give additional prestige to the newly unified kingdom of Spain, if I remember correctly) was written by Antonio de Nebrija and was called Grammatica dela Lingua Castellianna (1492). Other early texts on Spanish language were, La manera de escribir en castellano (Martín Cordero, 1556), Gramática castellana (Cristóbal de Villalón, 1558), and Ortografía castellana (Gonzalo Correas, 1630).

    The idea that Castilian is the Spanish language is something that evolved over time and is obviously not a settled matter today.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2009
  40. flljob

    flljob Senior Member

    México
    México español
    De niño yo llevé clases de Lengua Nacional, o sea, español. No sé por qué se trataba de evitar decir español o castellano.
    En la secundaria y en la prepa la materia era Español o Lengua y Literatura Españolas, y leíamos textos de España y de Hispanoamérica.
     
  41. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile
    Right, and thank you for that intervention, however, I was asking to the people that actually went to school within the last century... :)

    I find it incredible that in Uruguay they call it Spanish, whereas in Argentina and Chile we call it castellano. I wonder about Perú and the other Latin American countries. Mexico already seems to call it Spanish.
     
  42. OHSU Senior Member

    Tucson, Arizona
    English - American
    Ha, ha! Sorry for the obvious mistake and pointless post. I can be an idiot sometimes. You have my sincere apology.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2009
  43. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile
    No. On the contrary, you contributed with real knowledge and that is always appreciated. :)

    Now, I just found this:

    http://www.vaucanson.org/espagnol/linguistique/lenguas_espana_esp.htm

    Comienza diciendo que "El español es la lengua oficial nacional.. Se utiliza en todo el territorio. Se llama también castellano porque al principio era el idioma de Castilla."

    Más abajo hay un recuadro y que dice:

    "Artículo 3 de la constitución española

    1 El castellano es la lengua española oficial del Estado. Todos los españoles tienen el deber de conocerla y el derecho a usarla.

    2 Las demás lenguas españolas serán también oficiales en las respectivas Comunidades Autónomas de acuerdo con sus estatutos.

    3 La riqueza de las distintas modalidades lingüisticas de España es un patrimonio cultural que será objeto de especial respeto y protección."


    Esto lo encuentro muy interesante.

    Y creo que debiera dirimir la cuestión.
     
  44. OHSU Senior Member

    Tucson, Arizona
    English - American
    Well, it certainly concludes certain issues, but the primary focus of this thread (as noted in the opening post) is not about the officalness or correctness of castellano vs. español, but how individuals from various regions perceive the terms on a more personal level.

    Governments can't legislate attitude, and academies can't change people's culturally ingrained sensibility by decree. No amount of official documentation has application to the individual, personal perceptions we're discussing here.

    A great deal of very useful insight has been shared in this thread so far, insight that I don't believe appears in any other thread on this topic. As a non-native I have found this discussion invaluable, primarily because most people have avoided appeals to authority and have shared their personal intuitions.
     
  45. SebastianPGCE Senior Member

    Chilean Spanish
    Personalmente, tengo una lucha interna acerca de qué palabra usar. En mi círculo de amigos es algo mal visto decir español, sobretodo por la carga histórica que ello tiene en mi país. Es lo mismo que decir "Americano". No obstante, aunque trate de usar "castellano" no me sale naturalmente, y a pesar de que pienso que hay que tener una apertura de mente sobre el término, pues como se va a visto en este "thread" depende mucho de la localidad en que uno se encuentre, para mí no tiene una buena connotación decir "español" ....
     
  46. bailarín

    bailarín Senior Member

    Ciudadano del mundo
    English (USA)
    My Peruvian friend says that he speaks Castellano.
     
  47. chileno

    chileno Senior Member

    Las Vegas, Nv. USA
    Castellano - Chile
    For me is castellano. :)
     
  48. bx2 Senior Member

    Barcelona, Spain
    Catalan and Spanish
    Para la tranquilidad de todos quienes intervienen en este hilo, puedo decir con conocimiento de causa (o, al menos, dar mi opinión con razones justificadas) que este "problema" no se da únicamente en el caso de la lengua castellana/española. Lo he vivido personalmente en Flandes y en China.

    Puesto que es fin de año, espero que se me permita una anécdota personal.

    En una ocasión estaba en un taxi en Hong Kong. El taxista hablaba inglés con muchas dificultades, por lo que pasé a preguntarle, en chino mandarín, si él hablaba "chino" (zhong wen), en lugar de preguntarle si hablaba "lengua común" (putong hua), como debería haber hecho. Me respondió en mal chino mandarín y visiblemente molesto diciendo: "por supuesto: soy chino, luego hablo chino, pero mi idioma es el cantonés, no el mandarín. El cantonés es chino, ¿o no?"

    Y luego continuamos la conversación: yo le hablaba en chino mandarín y él me respondía con gruñidos.

    Me he permitido esta licencia porque creo que explica muchas cosas.

    Feliz año nuevo a todo el mundo.
     
  49. Södertjej

    Södertjej Senior Member

    Junto al Mediterráneo
    Spanish ES/Swedish (utlandssvensk)
    Pues en España/Estado español, es evidente que no está dirimida ni de lejos, pero comprendo que son interpretaciones sesgadas políticamente que no tienen nada que ver con los usos de los países de América. Yo lo he mencionado para indicar la utilización política del término en la realidad actual de aquí, y las connotaciones que se le puede dar dependiendo de la intención del hablante.
     
  50. elirlandes

    elirlandes Senior Member

    Dublin & Málaga
    Ireland English
    Como estranjero cuyo español proviene de Andalucia, puedo confirmar que mi experiencia de Andalucia está perfectamente reflejada en lo que dice Signatus. Toda la gente que conozco en el sur habla de español en cuanto al idioma que hablan - quizás por que no es "andaluz", pero sí es "su" idioma y también son españoles. Lo que sí que no se sienten es castellano, así que sería incongruente pensar que el idioma que consideran suyo se llamara por un lugar con el cual no tienen vínculo personal.
    Eso dicho, hablando con andaluces cultos, o cuando se habla de filología, historia de la lengua etc, se suele hablar de castellano... quizás en deferencia a su origen.
    En cuanto a la palabra "castellano", estoy de acuerdo otra vez con Signatus. Cuando me hablan de "castellano" yo también (como andaluz honorario o nacionalizado) pienso en esa versión del español hablado por los "chabales" o señoritos que bajan a la costa desde la meseta para veranear, y a los cuales debo moderar mi vocabulario andaluz para que me entiendan mi español.
     

Share This Page

Loading...