1. Bushwhacker

    Bushwhacker Senior Member

    Catalan
    The Lord of a castle is said "un castellano" in Castilian. In Middle Ages he was the "Señor." Is there any way to express "castellano" meaning "Lord of the castle" in English?

    Thanks a lot
     
  2. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    I can't think of a single word, and I would express it as you did, lord of the castle.
     
  3. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    We do have the cognate word "castellan," but it refers to the warden or governor of a castle, not necessarily to the "lord." Also it's a bit archaic.
     
  4. Bushwhacker

    Bushwhacker Senior Member

    Catalan
    Ah, yes, "castellano" can also mean "governor." Both meanings are possible. It seems then there is a distinction between "castellan" and "Lord" in English, taken into account what gengo has said too.

    Thanks a lot

     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2012
  5. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    And keep in mind that the vast majority of native English speakers will not know what the word castellan means. (Thanks for teaching me, Chris!)
     
  6. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    I'd had to go looking for it myself. I knew there was such a word, but couldn't remember how to spell it. At first all I could come up with was châtelaine, which is a loan word for the wife of a castellan.

    I see that in some cases "castillian" is also used as a synonym for castellan.
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2012
  7. Bushwhacker

    Bushwhacker Senior Member

    Catalan
    That's the origin of my question. I saw châtelaine, which seems a French word, and for castellan's wife, but what about the "Lord of the castle" or the "governor"? Thanks again
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2012

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