caster sugar

ascoltate

Senior Member
U.S.A. & Canada, English
Any idea how to say "caster sugar" in French? I'm trying to translate a recipe, and I'm not really quite sure what it is in English either except that it's fine-grained, I believe. Ideas (either of how to say it in French or of an English synonym I could translate)?
 
  • jjjbec

    Senior Member
    England/ English
    sucre en poudre.

    I don't think the different types of sugar in the two languages/ countries correspond exactly
     

    jjjbec

    Senior Member
    England/ English
    That's the thing- I did a translation using this a while back and can't quite remember, but I don't think there's an exact equivalence between what they sell in the Uk and in France. But don't know for America...
     

    ascoltate

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. & Canada, English
    Hmm... I'm going to try this question in the English only forum so I can see if I can grasp the English difference first. If anyone has any ideas in the meantime...
     

    Canard

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    LaRousse lists "caster sugar" as a Briticism of "sucre en poudre", even though the difference seems to be that caster sugar is not quite yet powdered, but just extremely finely granulated. Seems a minor difference!
     

    ascoltate

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. & Canada, English
    OK, triangulating from what I found out about "caster sugar" (a.k.a., castor sugar, a.k.a. superfine sugar, which is finer than granulated and not as fine as powdered/confectioner's sugar), it sounds as if this is "sucre semoule"--does this seem to make sense to people?
     

    marget

    Senior Member
    OK, triangulating from what I found out about "caster sugar" (a.k.a., castor sugar, a.k.a. granulated sugar, which is finer than granulated and not as fine as powdered/confectioner's sugar), it sounds as if this is "sucre semoule"--does this seem to make sense to people?

    I had the same problem when an Irish friend specified caster sugar in a recipe. She explained that it was what I would call "super fine" sugar in American English. Would someone know if sucre semoule is, in fact, super fine?

    Thanks in advance !:)
     

    marget

    Senior Member
    LaRousse lists "caster sugar" as a Briticism of "sucre en poudre", even though the difference seems to be that caster sugar is not quite yet powdered, but just extremely finely granulated. Seems a minor difference!

    I'm not sure that the difference is minor. I would never use powdered sugar if my recipe called for caster sugar. I am, however, a coward when it comes to taking chances. I go strictly by the books. Edit: I just confirmed that my dictionary translates powdered sugar as sucre glace. I suppose that sucre en poudre is different.
     

    redrose

    Member
    England British English
    I once bought vanilla sugar (in several tiny packets) in France, and that had the same consistency as caster sugar (I think the make was "Alsacienne"). Caster sugar grains are also about the same size as semolina sold for puddings in the UK. "Powdered sugar" sounds far more like icing sugar, which is more like the powdered form of plaster of Paris! Icing sugar certainly wouldn't substitute for caster sugar in all recipes.
     

    prof d'anglais

    Senior Member
    Hi again Ascoltate, having just answered your question in the English forum, I find you asking a similar question here in the French forum (incidentally, I trust there's no connection betwenn your ID and the famous Tate & Lyle sugat brand name). I've just been down to our kitchen cupboard to retrieve a plastic dispenser of 'Daddy' sucre glace that I'd used this morning on my gaufre and we'll be sprinkling over the strawberries from out garden, tonight. You still haven't told us what the recipe is for?
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    caster sugar is BE for AE superfine sugar, FR sucre semoule. You can use regular granulated sugar instead in a recipe but you have to mix it more thoroughly to make sure the grains dissolve

    AE confectioner's sugar is BE icing sugar, FR sucre glace (you usually can't switch this for any of the sugars above or you will have a mess!). It is a fine powder--like cornstarch.

    sucre vanillé is a fine granulated sugar that has absorbed the flavor of a vanilla bean and is usually cited in French dessert/sweet recipes rather than liquid vanilla essence. You have to make it yourself in North America, otherwise buy vanilla essence. 1 envelope of French sucre vanillé equals about a teaspoon of liquid vanilla

    PS Pay attention to the label--sometimes in French shops you will see sucre vanilliné, which is made with artificial vanilla and doesn't taste great!
     

    rig129

    Member
    Arabic-French-English
    quasi-synonyme(s) for sucre semoule
    sucre super fin n. m.
    sucre de fruit n. m.
    poudre de fruit n. f.
    sucre en poudre n. m.
    sucre à dissolution instantanée
     

    Paf le chien

    Senior Member
    France-French (Paris)
    PS Pay attention to the label--sometimes in French shops you will see sucre vanilliné, which is made with artificial vanilla and doesn't taste great!
    Just to say that it means they didn't put vanilla (very expensive, contains natural "vanilline") to give its taste but added chemical "vanilline" (cheap) which is chemically exactly(*) the same aroma than the one in natural vanilla: there is no difference between the two (except in the mind of those who know it).

    * Even the most sophisticated scientific materials (mass spectrometers) cannot help find a difference. The synthesis is quite obvious (one of the first) and very cheap.
     
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