catedrático + tenure

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AnaMaria

New Member
USA, English
:eek: La definicion de tenure es facil de encontrar -- pero como se traduce? it is a term of art? does anyone know what a Catedratico is? thanks for any help
 
  • Vicki

    Senior Member
    United States/English
    Dice el Diccionario Espasa:

    cátedra f Univ chair
    (instituto de bachillerato) head of department

    "Catedrático" (la persona) también se traduce así.

    Vicki
     

    David

    Banned
    AnaMaria...tenure can´t be translated exactly, I think, but vitalicio is an adjective often used to refer to a lifetime appointment, such as that held by some judges, (or God forbid, by some war criminals who get themselves appointed for life to the Senates of their countries) which is almost the same thing. Catedrático, as the folks have told you, is a high ranking faculty member, equivalent to "university professor" at some Institutions, or the holder of an endowed "chair." Sometimes it refers to the head of a department, as the Cátedra de Filòsofía in the University of Parangaricutirimícuaro. If you give us the specific example, maybe we can be more helpful.
     

    David

    Banned
    Cátedra, incidentally, is cognate with Cathedral. In the one case, it refers to the chair from which a professor lectured back when. In the latter case, it refers to the Bishop´s chair, or throne. Speaking ex cathedra in a religious context means making a pronouncement in one´s official, ecclesiastical capacity on a matter of "faith or morals," as opposed to say, voicing an opinion on the relative merits of chocolate or vanilla ice cream.
     

    Metaleer

    New Member
    Spain, Spanish (Not sure, though)
    A "tenured professor" is a "profesor titular." Profesores titulares can be either university or college professors, and one needs a Ph.D or equivalente degree to be a catedrático.
     

    Samovar

    New Member
    Spanish (Uruguay/Spain)
    Hi Ana Maria,

    I don't know the correct translation of the English terms into Spanish, but I'll give you my conclusions after a similar query. I think it is useful to have a description of what esach position means so you can choose whichever one you think fits better into that description.

    I think the problem is that the university system and the professors' positions vary form one country to another (even within Spanish-speaking contries), so translations may not be exact.

    -catedrático=chairman/chairwoman? As David said, it is almost a literal translation, the original meaning is the same: a chair from which professors used to give lectures.

    In Spain, Catedrático is the highest position (from an academic point of view; nothing to do with administrative positions such as rector - would that be dean?) in a teaching institution (I'll talk about the university which is the area I know better). It is a lifetime position and can only be attained after years of dedication and a high reputation. The number of cátedras is limited and can only be considered vacant in case the previous occupant of the chair retires (new ones are very rarely created).

    -profesor titular = tenured professor?

    A profesor titular is the next step down the ladder. In Spain, they are currently also lifelong positions, although that may change shortly. But the number of titulares is not limited, it depends of the size of the university/school/department, their teaching necessities and their economic resources.

    Sorry if this is too legthy, hope I helped you out!
    Samovar
     

    Metaleer

    New Member
    Spain, Spanish (Not sure, though)
    Samovar, hello!

    Mostly correct, yes, rector = dean/chancellor. In Spain, there are four tenured (funcionarios) ranks : Profesor Titular de Escuela Universitaria, Catedrático de Escuela Universitaria, Profesor Titular de Universidad and Catedrático de Universidad. Catedrático de Universidad is the highest rank, and professors of this rank can become University deans. A Profesor Titular de Escuela Universitaria doesn't require a Ph.D (doctorado), this rank will be abolished soon; all Profesores Titulares without a Ph.D will keep their jobs permanently until retirement. As you see, there ae two kinds of Catedráticos, a Catedrático de Escuela Universitaria is pretty much the same thing as a Profesor Titular de Universidad, though a Catedrático de Universidad is paid up to 15% more than their Profesor Titular counterparts.
     

    Samovar

    New Member
    Spanish (Uruguay/Spain)
    Aha! So it's a bit more complicated than I thought. You can't translate tenured professor precisely into Spanish because it can mean so many different things... you can only say that the person is a profesor and that he or she is a funcionario, but you don't know what his exact position would be in our system.

    On the other hand, (as far as I've been able to figure out up to now), a catedrático is a tenured professor who also holds a chair. Do you think this is more or less correct? This is just personal interest, I hope we're not getting Ana Maria more and more confused!! :confused: :)
     

    Travelman

    Senior Member
    Spain/Spanish
    Ana María,

    My experience is in British system, an easy rule would be

    tenured = funcionario

    Professor = catedrático

    Lecturer/reader = Profesor titular.

    Note that in Spanish we call to any teacher "profesor", and any chair is needed for this
     

    Metaleer

    New Member
    Spain, Spanish (Not sure, though)
    Samovar,

    Yes, that's pretty much an accurate and brief description. A tenured professor (funcionario) here in Spain could be anything from a Titular de Escuela Universitaria to the highest rank of Catedático de Universidad. Any of them can be called "professors" since separate ranks for assistant and associate professors already exist (that don't hold tenure.)

    Travelman, no te importa que te corrija, ¿no? :)

    Travelman said:
    Ana María,

    My experience is in British system, an easy rule would be :cross:

    tenured = funcionario

    Professor = catedrático

    Lecturer/reader = Profesor titular.

    Note that in Spanish we call to any teacher "profesor", and any chair is needed for this :cross:
    I am experienced in the British system :tick:
    Note that in Spanish we call any teacher "professor", and any chair is needed for this
     

    ScottFromUtah

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Después de todas estas explicaciones interesantes, me queda una pregunta. Mi esposa y yo vamos a vivir por 18 meses en el Perú después de jubilarnos de una universidad grande (Brigham Young University), donde éramos "full professors." ¿Cómo debemos responder a la pregunta "¿A qué se dedicaban?"?

    ¿Es suficientemente claro decir simplemente "Éramos profesores universitarios, mi esposa de la escritura técnia y yo de la química"?

    Gracias.
     

    chinesca

    Senior Member
    Peru - Spanish
    En Perú creo que un tenured professor sería un Profesor Principal, que es la jerarquía más alta. Por debajo están los profesores asociados y más abajo los profesores auxiliares.
     

    Glyndon

    Senior Member
    English
    En Canadá existen dos tipos de catedráticos básicos. El que tiene "tenure" es a tiempo completo y tiene una posición permanente, el "associate" está sujeto a contratos temporarios, no tiene una oficina permanente, da clases parciales, etc.
     

    chinesca

    Senior Member
    Peru - Spanish
    En Perú, aparte de la jerarquía mencionada, pueden ser "contratados" (por un tiempo y horas específicos), "a tiempo completo" (puede estar full time en una universidad y part time en otra) y "a dedicación exclusiva"
    Por profesor titular se entiende al responsable del curso, a diferencia del asistente, que muchas veces es un egresado de la facultad.

    En realidad, en este mundo globalizado no sé por qué no universalizan todos estos términos para evitar confusiones.
     

    Glyndon

    Senior Member
    English
    Generalmente un "associate pofessor" tiene su puesto por contrato, generelmente de un año, el cual puede o no ser renovado. Conozco algunos que llevan 20 años siendo renovados .... las universidades hacen esto debido al costo de mantener un tenured professor, aparte que es muy difícil desplazar a la persona, es un cargo de por vida. Claro que deben escribir y hacer investigación. Tenemos un dicho: "publish or perish" (publique o muere).
     
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